Bouncing Back From Burnout Interview With Jessica Smith, RN

Bouncing Back From Burnout Interview With Jessica Smith, RN

Nurse burnout sucks.  I’ve totally been there. 

So, it may seem odd at first to hear that I also LOVE talking about nurse burnout. In fact, I think every nurse experiences burnout at some point in their career (if you haven’t please email me back and let me know your secret!). 

Here’s the kicker.  Once you admit you have an issue with nursing burnout you open yourself to the idea of potential solutions.  But if you just pull your hoodie over your eyes and continue to suffer in silence then nothing ever changes.  And your burnout gets even worse.

So, let’s talk about solutions for nurse burnout!  (Solving problems is always better than complaining anyway). 

Bouncing back from nurse burnout
Last week I had an amazing opportunity to interview with nurse coach and fellow ER nurse, Jessica Smith about bouncing back from burnout!

Our Bouncing Back From Burnout YouTube interview can be found here

During the interview, we discussed:

  • How you can find a work-life balance with a busy nursing schedule;
  • Why nurses need to make their own health a #1 priority;
  • How getting to the “why” in your burnout can help you find patterns that contribute to your burnout;
  • And why you should always surround yourself with positive support!

I’d love for you to listen in – and even better – leave a comment or share it with your fellow nurse friends!  

Again, the link to listen in can be found here!

I can’t wait for you to check it out!

P.S.  If you are a nurse struggling with finding ways to take better care of yourself, here is a FREE E-BOOK .  It’s called Nurse, Take Care Of Yourself First.  Because nurses work really, really hard.  And we need to be taking better care of ourselves.  It includes tips for nurses on how to stay healthy during 12 hour shifts, ideas for better self care at home and suggestions for finding a better work-life balance.  

Additional Recommended Reading:

7 Ways To Beat Nurse Burnout
Nurse Burnout:  How Administration Can Help
How To Achieve A Work-Life Balance As A Nurse
Nurse Health:  Self- Care For 12 Hours Shift

Nurse Life:  How To Achieve A Work Life Balance

Nurse Life: How To Achieve A Work Life Balance

Many nurses struggle with finding a work life balance.  With increasingly demanding 12-hour shifts, its tough to stay healthy and sane when you are constantly going mile a minute. In time you may become overwhelmed and unsatisfied with your nursing career and your personal life.

Nurse burnout is real.  The journey towards a satisfying work life balance as a nurse is within your control and will only be attainable if you make it a priority. 

Consider doing a little soul-searching.  Take a moment to sit quietly with yourself and pinpoint exactly what you need to simplify your life.  Here are a few things to consider on your journey to creating a better work life balance as a nurse:

a nurse smiling

1.  What are your priorities?

Take inventory of both your nursing life and personal life.  Is it possible you may be juggling too many balls in the air?  What do you envision your life to be like in 5 years? 

Sit down and write a 1, 3 and 5 year plan.  Make specific goals. You simply cannot create a satisfying work-life balance without fine tuning your personal and work goals.  Be brutally honest.  Are you making major life decisions based on what you want to do or what you feel like you should do?

Many people (ahem, nurses!) are inherent caregivers who often give more to others before themselves.  Now is a good time to think about how you will care for yourself firstYour happiness and success is your responsibility.  Start by prioritizing what is most important to you!

2.  Manage your stress

You have to manage your stress to achieve a work/life balance.  This is a non negotiable! 

Here are two helpful ways to manage stress:  #1)  get moving with some type of physical activity (may I suggest yoga?) and/or #2)  meditate (or just take a little time to chill out by yourself).

The benefits of exercise and mediation on  physical and mental health are well documented in literature.  For example, The Mayo Clinic has stated that “yoga may help reduce stress, lower blood pressure and lower your heart rate” among many other benefits (my yoga practice has been a life saver for me!).

In addition, a study published in the National Institute of Biotechnology Information investigated the effects of yoga on stress coping strategies of ICU nurses. After only 8 weeks of yoga the results showed that the participating ICU nurses had significantly better focus coping strategies and a major reduction in perceived mental pressure.  Just imagine how much better YOU could feel as a nurse who commits to a regular yoga practice.

Note:  It doesn’t have to be yoga (although yoga has remarkably changed my life for the better over the past ten years).  Exercise can come in any form you want it to:  running, hiking, swimming, pole jumping, dancing in your living room….  The best kind of exercise is the kind that you actually do!

3.  Create more flexibility

In addition to the (literal) flexibility I get from yoga, I have also found flexibility within my workplace and at home.

12 hour shift schedules are already rigid enough.  To find a work life balance that works for you, consider other alternative scheduling options available in your workplace.

As a nurse and a new mom I found that becoming a per diem nurse allowed me to create a better work/life balance for myself.

As a per diem nurse, I am literally employed “by the day.” Hospitals need the flexibility of per diem nurses so they can manage daily staffing needs in the hospital.  There are many pros and cons to being a per diem nurse and it is the only way I am able to effectively be a working mom at this time.Here is another way to create flexibility in your life:  Try squeezing your workouts in early in the morning before your family is awake.  Sure, you will be tired, but you will also feel incredible for the rest of the day! (I have been practicing hot yoga at 5:30 AM twice a week before my tribe wakes up and it is helping me function so much better).

4.  Think outside of the box

Working 12 hour hospital shifts at the beginning of your career is an excellent way to gain clinical expertise and build a solid career base.  But it is not the only career path within the nursing universe.  There are many unique and alternative avenues a nurse can take!

If you are a nurse suffering from burnout and looking for alternative career paths, you are in luck.   Finding a new way to practice nursing may help you find the work life balance you have been looking for.

Here are a few ideas, just to get your brain thinking outside the box!:

Are you a nurse who is struggling with how to achieve a work life balance?  I enjoy hearing thoughts and ideas from other fellow nurses.  Please leave a comment below!

P.S.  Don’t forget to sign up for our newsletter- receive a free gift when you sign up below!

Different Types of Nurses & Nursing Specialties

Different Types of Nurses & Nursing Specialties

There are so many different types of nurses in different specialties that work within the hospital setting.  So how do you figure out which one is right for you?

When I was initially toying with the idea of going back to college to become a nurse I had no idea how many types of nursing specialties there actually were.  I thought there was just a single “type” of nurse who did pretty much everything.

I was so wrong.  That just shows how little I actually knew about the nursing world back then!  In fact, I think many potential nurses who are contemplating getting a BSN may think the same thing as I once did.

The good news about starting out in nursing school is that you don’t have to make a decision about what type of nursing specialty you want to go into right away.  At least not until you get closer to the end of nursing school and start interviewing for jobs.    In addition, you can even change your nursing specialty during your career if you want (I did it and reignited my passion for nursing).  So, if you find you don’t enjoy one specialty after a while, you can look into others that might better suit you.

This particular post explores nursing career specialties within the hospital.  If you don’t want to work in the hospital, that’s OK.  There are a ton of opportunities to explore as a new grad nurse outside of the hospital setting too!  However, if the hospital setting is for you (as it was for me) then this is a quick and dirty explanation of the different types of nurses and nursing specialties that may be available to you!

Nursing Specialties & Opportunities In The Hospital Setting

There are literally dozens of different nursing specialties and levels of care in the hospital to choose from.  When deciding on a specialty it may help to start with the level of care that works best with your personality and then work from there.  While some nursing students think the intensity of working in an emergency room might be exhilarating, others may prefer to start out by learning on a medical surgical unit instead.

The next step may be to consider which patient age groups you would most enjoy working with.  For example, a nursing school friend of mine knew from the moment she applied to nursing school that she had to be a pediatric nurse.  Yet another student friend was passionate about working in the geriatric community.  Some nurses find that they love working with newborn babies or children, while others find that they enjoy the intensity of managing patients at the ICU level of care.

Lastly, as you start studying more about the different body systems and doing clinical hours, you can decide which specialties that you are most interested in.  Being a student nurse is a great time to learn all about the different types of nurses in the hospital you might want to work in!

Hospital Levels of Care

Medical/Surgical Care

Medical Surgical Care, otherwise known as Med/Surg, is the largest nursing specialty in the United States.  Med/Surg nurses care for adult patients who are acutely ill with a wide variety of medical issues or are recovery from surgery.  Nurses on these units often care for 4-5 patients (or more) depending on acuity.

Telemetry Care

Telemetry Unit patients are often more acutely ill and need constant monitoring.   Patients here are monitored with telemetry monitors that allow nurses to review a patient’s vital signs constantly so they can give more detailed care.  Often, Med/Surg and Telemetry patients are referred to interchangeably as many Telemetry Units have both types of patients.

Intensive Care Units

An Intensive Care Unit, otherwise known as an ICU or Critical Care Unit is a unit that provides a higher level of intensive patient care.  Patients in the ICU often have severe and life-threatening injuries which require constant, close monitoring.  Nurses in the ICU usually only care for 1 or 2 patients at a time due to the high acuity of the patient care.

Emergency Room

ER nurses treat patients in emergent situations who are involved in a trauma or other life threatening injuries.   These nurses deal with patients from all age groups involving many different levels of patient care.  You may have patients with illnesses and wounds ranging from dog bites or minor burns to more serious conditions such as strokes or other trauma victims.

Patient Age Groups

Hospital units are also broken into different age groups to offer more specialized care.  This is also something to consider when deciding on a specialty you want to work in.  Some of the age groups include:

  • Newborns
  • Pediatrics
  • Adult
  • Geriatric

Hospital Specialties

There is a general list of hospital specialty units that many nurses work in:

  • Cardiovascular
  • Thorasic
  • Neuro/Trauma
  • Medical
  • Orthopedic
  • Radiaology
  • Hematology/Oncology
  • Liver Transplant
  • PACU
  • Emergency Room
  • Neonatal
  • Urology
  • Surgical
  • Gynecology
  • Operating Room

Are you thinking about becoming a nurse and wondering what nursing specialties might be best for you?  Or do you have any other questions about the different types of nurses in the hospital setting?  Please leave a comment or question below!

7 Ways To Beat Nurse Burnout

7 Ways To Beat Nurse Burnout

I experienced nurse burnout after 2 years of being a nurse.

That’s right.  After only TWO YEARS, I was already feeling over stressed, exhausted and negative about my career.

When my mind finally wrapped itself around this understanding, I thought I’ve barely graduated with my BSN and i’m ALREADY burned out? How am I going to continue in the nursing profession for an entire career?  

I was frustrated, confused, and to be honest, a little heartbroken.  I was passionate about helping others and I did enjoy the mental stimulation that I got as a nurse.  But I couldn’t figure out how there were nurses on our unit who had been doing the same thing for the last 5, 10, or even 20 years.  Didn’t they feel the same way?

Lately, I have spoken with a lot of nurses about their experiences with burnout. The truth of the matter is that most, if not all nurses feel spent and exhausted  at some point over the course of their career.

Do you feel exhausted, anxious, physically ill, or dread the thought of going to work each day? If so, you too may be experiencing burnout. Here are some tips that can help you overcome this chronic, stressful state and learn to thrive again.

7 Ways To Beat Nurse Burnout

7 ways to beat nurse burnout:  reclaim your passion!

 1.  Find a work-life balance.

Are you rotating days and nights?   Constantly working overtime?   Or maybe just working too many hours per week?  That may work for a while but it is not a very good long term plan.  Everyone needs a break, especially nurses!  Consider taking a vacation (or stay-cation) and plan a few solid days of  “me” time.  A little TLC can go a long way.   You simply can’t continue to take good care of others before taking care of yourself first.

Becoming a per diem nurse helped me find a better work-life balance.  What can you do to help balance your life?

2.  Make your health a #1 priority.

One of the best things a nurse can do to help prevent nurse burnout is to take good care of themselves.  Often this notion is counter intuitive to nurses because the nature of their job is to constantly put others needs in front of their own.  Ask yourself, what do I need to be healthy?  Here are a few suggestions:

3.  Find the “why” in your burnout.

What is it that is really causing you to feel the burnout?  Try writing your thoughts down at the end of a few shifts to help figure out what is overwhelming you.  Is there a pattern?   Perhaps you need to plan your shifts differently.  Are there a few personalities in your workplace that you are not jiving with?  Or, maybe you just are not inspired by your chosen specialty.  Give yourself permission to be brutally honest about what you need to overcome nurse burnout.

4.  Challenge yourself.

Are you under-challenged at work?  There are so many ways to challenge yourself as a nurse:

  • Become a certified nurse in your specialty (or a completely new specialty!)
  • Take on a charge nurse role.
  • Be a preceptor to novice nurses on your unit.
  • Take on additional committee roles.
  • Attend a nurse conference.
  • Change your nursing specialty.
  • Consider advancing your nursing degree.

5. Surround yourself with positive support.

Compassion fatigue and nurse burnout is so common among nurses.  Left unchecked, it can lead to mistakes, unhappiness or even depression.   Share your burnout struggles with a close comrade from work who can empathize with your struggle.   If that doesn’t help, consider talking to a trusted mentor, a therapist, or find a career coach that can help you work your way out of nurse burnout.  Nurses are self-giving creatures by nature, but we must give to our own needs as well.  Crawl out of your shell and start talking it out!

6. Find an outlet.

What do you do on your days off that may you happy?  If you don’t have a stress-reliving outlet, then its time to find one!  Is your inner artist craving a creative outlet, such as painting, designing or even scrap booking? Does a day on the golf course  or an afternoon on the tennis court bring you joy?  Maybe you have been so busy that you have forgotten how wonderfully distracting in can be do become enveloped into an activity that you love do do.

Research has shown that finding a joyful outlet can enhance your mood, increase energy, lower stress levels, and even make your immune system stronger. Today is the time to find your joy!

7. Consider new options.

Have an honest discussion with yourself about your career.   Are you a med/surg nurse who has always dreamed of working in the ICU?  Or maybe you are an ER nurse with an interest in becoming a flight nurse.  A change in specialty might be exactly what you need to tackle nurse burnout.

On another note, nurses don’t have to work in a hospital.   Perhaps working with injectables in a dermatology office or as a home healthcare nurse would be a better fit . There are so many nursing careers to choose from.   The sky is the limit.  Go find your nursing passion!

What do you do to beat nurse burnout?  Leave a comment below!

Travel Nurses Need Yoga To Stay Healthy!

Travel Nurses Need Yoga To Stay Healthy!

If you know anything about me at all, you know that I absolutely LOVE yoga (its a little obsessive actually).

And as you also know, I really love to write about how to help nurses take better care of themselves.

Which is why I was so excited to write a guest post for a travel nursing blog titled 3 Very Important Reasons Why Travel Nurses Need Yoga.  (Please check it out here!).

Travel nurses have a lot on their plate!  They take travel assignments in cities where they’ve never even been and then work in different units with entirely new staff.   And then when they finally think they have everything figured out their assignment ends and they go someplace else!

On top of that they also have the physical and mental stress that comes with working 12 hours shifts.

Travel nurses need yoga.

By taking care of ourselves we are able to replenish our reserves and take better care of our patients and families.  There is an endless amount of studies on yoga and its amazing benefits on physical and mental health.

As nurses, we need to practice what we preach and help lead our patients by example.  Why should our patients take better care of themselves both physically and mentally if we are not doing it ourselves?

My Yoga Props Essentials:

Gaiam Yoga Mat 

I love this mat because it doesn’t get slippery once I start getting sweaty during a yoga practice.  It is a thicker, more durable mat with a great chakra design.

Yoga Blocks

Cork yoga blocks are the best.  I love these blocks because they are durable and have a really good grip.  They can assist with alignment and help you get deeper into many yoga poses.

Yoga Bolster

These are amazing for restorative chest opening poses!  I have 2 of these in blue and purple.  I use them all the time to help me wind down after nursing shifts.  I also love using the booster to put my hips and legs up the wall after being on my feet for a twelve hour shift!