5 Best Nurse Jobs For Moms

5 Best Nurse Jobs For Moms

What are the best nurse jobs for moms?

Having a baby changes everything.  New mothers may want to think about alternative nurse careers that provide more flexibility for their growing family.   It is possible to be great in both areas.

Fortunately, there are so many flexible nurse careers out there for nurses who are ready for a change or just want to step away from the bedside.

Becoming a mother is a full-time job in itself.  Depending on your work-life situation, you might want to consider working in a nursing field that is more flexible and offers you the balance that you need.  Childcare can be a challenge for nurses, especially for moms who work 12-hour shifts.

In no particular order, here are 5 of the best nurse jobs for moms:

#1.  Per diem nursing

The best nurse jobs for moms- per diem nursing

#1. Best nurse jobs for moms: per diem nursing

To work “per diem” means to work “by the day.” Per diem nurses are essential to every hospital organization because they allow the administration to fill in gaps where they don’t have enough nurses scheduled to work.  It also will enable nurses who don’t have a very flexible schedule, like new moms, to pick the exact hours and days that they can work.

Per diem nurses are often required to work a specific amount of shifts each month.  As a per diem nurse myself, I am required to work a minimum of four shifts in a thirty day period.   However, I can ask to work as many shifts as I want.  It puts me in an excellent position to earn money-  I work on all of the days that I have childcare scheduled, and I don’t have to worry about being scheduled on the days I don’t.

Also, per diem nurses are usually able to call off within a specific time frame before a shift starts.  For example, if my child becomes sick 12 hours before the start of a nursing shift, and I know I will be unable to work the next day, then I can cancel myself.  It leaves a lot of wiggle room for me to schedule or unschedule myself when I need to be at home with my children.  Most working moms don’t have that kind of flexibility, and it helps relieve a lot of stress.

The one drawback to per diem nursing is that you are only paid on the days that you work – you don’t have an allotment of sick days.  Also, if the facility does not need any additional staffing, then you might get canceled.  Which might not be OK if you were depending on the money you were going to earn that day.

Why being a per diem nurse is one of the best nursing jobs for moms:

  • Total flexibility over work schedules
  • Ability to call-off at the last minute
  • Higher per hour pay then career nursing

 

#2.  School Nurse

The best nurse jobs for moms- school nurse

#2.  Best nurse jobs for moms:  school nurse

School nurses work in educational facilities, including public and private schools (K through 12).  They support students and staff who become ill at work or need other kinds of medical attention.

Also, many school nurses are educators and teach various health topics to kids, such as healthy eating and the importance of physical exercise.  School nurses address the physical and mental needs of students, which helps them succeed in school and sets them up for success in the future.

Becoming a school nurse is an excellent job for nurses who are mothers because you would work during regular school hours -the same hours that your children would be at school.  It also means that you wouldn’t have to work weekends, night shifts, or holidays.

Many school nurses find the career rewarding because you are able to help start kids out on the right health track from their early years.  Many studies show that long term health has a greater success rate when children are taught healthy habits from an early age.  School-age kids are impressionable, and nurses can make a significant impact on how they take care of their health as they grow up.

Why being a school nurse is one of the best nursing jobs for moms:

  • Only work during regular school hours (no weekends, nights or holidays)
  • A rewarding career helping children develop healthy habits from a young age

Additional recommended reading:  

 

#.  Case management

The best nurse jobs for moms- case management

#3.  Best nurse jobs for moms: case management

Case management is another great opportunity for working moms because you can help patients through planning, care coordination, facilitation, and advocacy of patient’s medical needs.  Case managers collaborate with all outside aspects of patient care to make sure the patient stays safe and gets the care they need.

According to the Case Management Society of America, “Case Management is a collaborative process of assessment, planning, facilitation, care coordination, evaluation, and advocacy for options and services to meet an individual’s and family’s comprehensive health needs through communication and available resources to promote patient safety, quality of care, and cost-effective outcomes.”

Additional recommended reading:  8 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Became A Nurse

#4.  Telehealth nursing

The best nurse jobs for moms- teleheath nurse

#4.  Best nurse jobs for moms:  teleheath nurse

Telehealth nursing is when nurses can give nursing care, information, or advice to patients over the phone.  It also helps to improve efficiency in the healthcare system and help to treat patients in remote areas who otherwise would not be able to receive care.

Telehealth nurses work in hospitals, doctors’ offices, and for corporations.  It is becoming more widely used in recent years due to improvements in technology and an ncreasing need to help patients remotely.

Why telehealth is one of the best nursing jobs for moms:

  • Ability to work remotely from home
  • Able to help patients without having to work strenuous shifts in the hospital

#5.  Advice Nurse

Best jobs for nurses - advice nurse

#5.  Best jobs for nurses:  advice nurse

When patients are not feeling well at home or have a question about a medical issue, advice nurses are used to help field questions via phone.  One of the most significant benefits to patients is that it helps them determine what kind of medical care they need before they come into the hospital.

Why advice nursing is one of the best nursing jobs for moms:

  • Flexible hours
  • Sometimes a work from home position
  • Less strenuous then 12-hour work shifts at the hospital
  • Ability to help patients remotely

In conclusion

There are so many alternative nurse careers for nurses who are moms.  In fact, that is one of the best reasons to become a nurse – the nursing profession offers so many unique career opportunities that other professions simply do not.

Take care of your family first, and fit your nursing career in a way that serves your family best.  Good luck!

Additional recommended reading:

Working Mom Guilt Is Stupid.  Here’s Why.

Working Mom Guilt Is Stupid. Here’s Why.

Do you feel guilty because you are a working mom?

Many working mothers worry if their kids will end up OK.  Especially when they are constantly “leaning in” to the workplace and home at the same time.

But the kids will be alright.  Truly.  Even if you have to spend many hours away from them every day.

The reality is that 70 percent of mothers with kids under 18 work outside the home, and 40 percent are breadwinners.  With the high cost of living in some cities, many moms have no choice but to work.

There is, however, good news, according to recent evidence.  Many studies show that having a working mother is not only suitable for financial reasons – but the situation has several positives for kids and the family as well.

Additional recommended reading:  Simple Mom Self-Care Goals You Need Now

There is no need to have working mom guilt, according to several studies

* Post contains affiliate links.

As an ER nurse, I often see firsthand how lucky I am just to have healthy children.

Every single day I work with the parents of kids who are unwell. It’s hard to feel sorry for myself as a working mom when I see how hard they struggle. It’s a perspective that I wish more people had because it puts the challenges of working motherhood into perspective.

There are so many societal pressures about what mothers should be doing.  Many of these pressures have become unspoken rules that we find ourselves following even though we don’t realize it.   Likely, we are just so ridiculously busy that we don’t have time to examine these thoughts and feelings to see if they are even true.

But these insidious thoughts about working mom guilt feel genuine, and that’s why we feel so guilty about them.  But while our children are the centerpieces in our lives – especially when they are little – it doesn’t mean that they can’t function without us looking over their shoulders each minute of the day.

My kids don’t need me every time they color in their coloring books or create art; they don’t need me spoon-feeding them their meals.  They will figure out a way to get in their mouths if they are hungry.

They certainly don’t need me welcoming them with Pinterest-friendly snacks every time they come through the door.

Giving our kids space also gives them autonomy to learn on their own, in their way.

Children build self-esteem by figuring out how to do things by themselves.  It makes them feel good,  and they like to repeat the things that make them feel good about themselves.  It is a recipe for healthy personal growth and self-development.

Maybe, as mothers, we just need to get out of our kid’s way and let them do their thing.

And finally, for once and for all, let’s just stop feeling guilty.

there is no need to have working mom guilt, according to evidence

Working mom guilt is unnecessary, according to evidence.

Here is more evidence for those with working mom guilt:

#1.  Studies show that daughters and sons benefit from having a working mom

According to a Harvard research study, daughters of working moms are more likely to advance in their careers, and sons of working moms go on to spend 50 minutes more each week caring for their own families.

As a working mother of both a daughter and a son, it was good to hear that working would positively benefit my children’s participation in both work and home. The study showed that having a working mom did not influence the future careers of sons one way or another.  However, mother’s employment is essential to how much their sons participate with their own children later on in life.

The take-away is that working mothers have a chance to help their daughters be more financially independent as adults -and teach sons to participate as fathers.

#2.  Kids of working moms are just as happy

The same Harvard study later showed that kids of working moms wind up just as happy in adulthood as the children of moms who stayed home.

The belief that having a working mother is somehow damaging their children is just not true. For mothers with concerns that their working outside of the home is somehow making their children unhappy, this should bring some relief.


#3.  Working moms may be happier

The outrageous amount of multitasking that many mothers are required to do to have a career and care for children can be overwhelming.  However, despite the challenges that come with finding a work-life balance, many moms who work say they’re healthier and happier than moms who stay at home.

This tells me that mothers can – and should-  do what makes them happy.  If that means staying at home, great!  If having a career works better for you and your family, then that is OK too.

#4.  Being out of the workforce for even a few years causes women’s earnings to plummet

Many women already earn 70 cents to the dollar than men in similar jobs.  But add time taken off for childbearing years, and women are also paying something known as “the mommy tax.” Being a stay-at-home mom costs a lot of money.

Ann Crittenden wrote a book called The Price Of Motherhood:  Why The Most Important Job In The World Is Still The Least Valued.  She makes a few interesting points: about the cost of mothers leaving the workplace:

  •  A couple with a total income of $81,500, and two equally capable partners, could lose as much as $1,350,000 in lifetime income if they have a child.

And another about how stay-at-home mothers receive fewer benefits then nannies:

  • Nannies qualify for Social Security benefits, but mothers at home do not. Unpaid caregivers are not covered by the same social safety net that covers other workers.

Additional recommended reading:  3 Healthy School Day Breakfast Ideas For Kids

It is OK to enjoy being a working mom

Don’t succumb to the guilt of being a working mom. It’s OK, really.

Being a working mom often provides many women with cerebral stimulation that they don’t get at home.

I love being an emergency room nurse and a science geek at heart.  I am challenged and stimulated while I am working with patients in a way that I’m not at home.   I have had the opportunity to see more disease states, complex injuries, and unusual diagnoses than I ever could have imagined even existed.

It would not be an exaggeration to say I learn ten new things every day at work. Also, I am surrounded by some of the most intelligent people I have ever met. Many of my co-workers have the same drive for helping people I do. They motivate me to keep learning.

The bottom line is that it is essential to do what is right for your family.   Doing what works for you to keep your family functioning, healthy, and happy is what matters.

It may mean lowering the bar in some other areas of our lives.  There is no winner for the cleanest house.  Saying that your home is messy because you play with your kids is a privilege.  And I am so grateful for that privilege on the days I don’t work.

Whatever kind of mom you are – free yourself of the judgment that what you are doing is wrong or bad.  And funnel that energy into creating a family life that engages, inspires, and invites joy into your days.

Additional recommended reading:

10 Fun Holiday Nurse Mom Gifts (in 2020)

10 Fun Holiday Nurse Mom Gifts (in 2020)

Nurse moms are pretty incredible humans.

Being a nurse or a mom is hard work in and of itself.  Add the two together and you have one incredibly hard-working, compassionate, multitasking superhero with skills that can save lives.

This holiday season why not give gifts that recognize both talents?  The one that is raising children to be strong, capable adults and the one selflessly helping total strangers.  After all, there is a fair chance that many nurse moms are not being appreciated or recognized for the dedication and hard work they put in, day after day.

The motherhood/nurse combination is a challenging balance.    Next time you run into a nurse mom who looks a little tired, know there is a good chance she hasn’t slept in a week.  And give her a high-five.

We hope you enjoy your holiday season and spend lots of quality time with your loved ones!

*This post about gifts for nurse moms contains affiliate links.  You can find our disclosure page here.

10 Fun Holiday Gifts For Nurse Moms

The Ultimate List Of Fun Holiday Nurse Mom Gifts

 

1.  I’m a Mom and a Nurse Nothing Scares Me Pink Mug

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2.  Keep Calm My Mom Is A Nurse Onesie

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3.  Keep Calm I’m A Nurse And A Mom Mug

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4.  Safety First, Drink With A Nurse 15 oz Wine Glass

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5.  I’m A Mom And Nurse Nothing Scares Me Shirt

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6My Mom Is A Nurse Dog T-Shirt

 

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7.  Boss Lady Mug

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8.  Wife Mom Nurse 16 oz Tumbler

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9.  Wife, Mom, Nurse Retractable Badge Reel

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10.  Nurse Mates Ultimate Nursing Bag For Women

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3 Ways Being a Nurse Prepared Me For Motherhood

3 Ways Being a Nurse Prepared Me For Motherhood

Being a nurse helped prepare me for motherhood.

Nothing can prepare any parent for the insanity of parenthood, because it’s impossible to understand its complexity until you’re there.  However, after working as a nurse for so many years before having my children, I do think it gave me a tiny edge.  

As an emergency room nurse, I work in a lot of unusual and often stressful situations involving the health and wellbeing of my patients.    Admittedly, I’m exhausted on my days off, and sometimes I feel guilty for working such long hours.

But even though I often feel overwhelmed with my crazy life as a working mom, I am so grateful for how my experience as a registered nurse has helped prepare me for motherhood. 

Additional recommended reading:  Is Nursing A Good Career For Moms?

Toddlers can act just like miniature psych patients.

In the ER, I deal with every single type of mental and psychiatric disorder ever documented in the literature.   We work with everything from homicidal schizophrenia to depression or anxiety and everything in between.

Some of the most exciting conversations I have with my two-year-old remind me of similar situations and conversations that I have had working as a healthcare professional.

For example, I have watched my toddler throw herself on the floor in a fit of tears because I didn’t peel the banana “the right way” (believe it or not, I have had similar conversations with patients).   I guess you could say that I have had a lot of experience with having irrational discussions over the years.  

As a result of my experience working in an ER with an acute psych ward, I have almost no reaction when my toddler melts down or breaks into a fit of rage out of nowhere.  I have had too much experience dealing with angry, irrational patients.  Having composure and speaking with respect is always the winning choice and warrants the best response in both scenarios.  (When a nurse gets mad back at a patient, the patients yells louder.  It’s the same with toddlers).

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I stopped worrying about things that aren’t worth my worry.

As a nurse and mom, I am generally more concerned about the things that might seriously injure or kill my children.  Sure, a broken arm would suck, and no mom wants to see their child in pain. But a broken bone won’t kill you. Like, for example, falling out a window in a home that hasn’t been childproofed could.

I want my home safe from the significant injuries, but I also don’t want to helicopter-parent them from ever injuring themselves. 

(But I also have an irrational fear of swimming pools now too as a direct result of my experience as an ER nurse, so I suppose being a nurse and mom has also made me a bit paranoid as well).  

The way I see it is that kids grow and learn so much through play. If they are playing right, they are going to get hurt once in a while.  Minor injuries are a part of childhood, and having them can help kids grow and develop resilience to other things that happen to them out in the world.  

Additional recommended reading:  9 Tips For Working As A Nurse While Pregnant

Being a nurse is a constant reminder of how lucky I am to have healthy children.  

I have had the privilege of working with pediatrics as an emergency medicine nurse.  As a result, I have watched a lot of parents deal with their children’s chronic illnesses, life-threatening injuries, and so many other medical-related issues that can keep kids in the hospital for weeks, months, or even years.

It makes it hard for me to complain about how busy my life is as a working mother.  Because in reality, when you have healthy children, you have everything that you need. 

As a working mom and nurse, I see a lot of the bad things that can happen, and it makes me more grateful for the things I have.  It is all a challenging balance.  But it is also an honor and a privilege – and it has prepared me for motherhood in a way that nothing else really could.

Addiontial recommended reading:

3 Helpful Tips For Parents Working The Night Shift

3 Helpful Tips For Parents Working The Night Shift

*This post may contain affiliate links.  You can find our disclosure page here.  

Written by Adela Ellis, RN, BSN

Working the night shift is never easy.   Add a kid or two into the mix and it becomes even that much more difficult.

Life can be challenging for working parents, even in the best of circumstances and working night shifts is no exception.  Raising kids when you are sleep deprived is challenging at best, and it’s often challenging to find someone who can take care of your children while you’re on the clock.

There are perks, though. For example, nurses are usually paid more per hour when they work nights instead of days, and working nights means that you’ll have more time to spend with your family during the day.  There is even some evidence that working the night shift can benefit the parent-child relationship.

Plus, the lines at the grocery store tend to be really short first thing in the morning when night shift workers are heading home. 

If you are a parent and you are struggling with how to make working the night shift work, you’ve come to the right place.  Keep scrolling to discover three tips for parents working the night shift.

Night Shift Nurse Tip #1:  Prioritize Self-Care

Woman Running

Night shift nurse tip #1: prioritize self-care

As a parent, you probably put your kids’ needs ahead of your own pretty much all the time. But it’s important to remember that you need to take care of yourself too.  Self-care is important for everyone, and it is even more important for nurses who work the night shift.

Working the night shift can take a serious toll on your physical, mental, and emotional well-being.

As humans, we are naturally programmed to be awake during the day and asleep at night. Working the night shift means fighting against one of your body’s most basic instincts, and it’s not easy.

To minimize the negative effects of working nights, you need to make self-care a priority.  Make sure you get plenty of sleep each day, maintain a healthy diet, drink plenty of water, and pamper yourself once in a while.

Set boundaries with family members (including your children) to ensure that you are able to get the rest you need. Don’t feel guilty about saying “no” to afternoon playdates if you need to sleep. If you want to be the best version of yourself, both at home and at work, you need to make taking care of yourself a top priority.

Even choosing the right clothing to wear to work can be a part of your self-care. Invest in quality scrubs that you will feel great wearing. Keep in mind that you’re likely to get chilly during the night and make sure you have a few nice scrub jackets in your closet. Invest in high-quality nursing shoes that won’t leave you feeling fatigued just a few hours into your shift. When you feel your best in cute nurse scrubs and comfy footwear, it’s a lot easier to make it through your shift with a smile on your face.

Additional recommended reading:  

Night Shift Nurse Tip #2:  Find an Amazing Babysitter

babysitter taking care of kids for night shift working mom

Tip #2 for working the night shift with a family: find an amazing babysitter

If you and your partner work opposite shifts, having someone to watch the kids while you are at work might not be a problem. But don’t make the mistake of thinking that you won’t need someone to watch them during the day too. You may get home first thing in the morning and not need to return to work until later that night, but you need that time to get some rest. 

Plenty of parents think that they can work at night and take naps throughout the day when the kids are asleep, but that very rarely works out. You might not need a sitter if your kids are in school during the day, but, if you have little ones at home, a good sitter is a must.

Find someone that you can depend on to watch your kids on a consistent schedule. You need between seven and nine hours of sleep each day (roughly), so make sure you choose a sitter who is available for enough hours each day to enable you to get some much-needed sleep. Consider sending your kids to daycare or choosing a sitter who can watch them in their home. This will help minimize the noise in your home and allow you to rest without worrying about why your little one is crying or being woken up by random noises throughout the day.

Night Shift Nurse Tip #3:  Learn to Embrace the Night Shift

Nurse working the night shift and smiling

Working night shift with a family tip #3: embrace the night shift

For most parents, one of the hardest parts of working the night shift is knowing that you’ll have to miss out on things like family get-togethers and school events. A big part of your kids’ lives will happen when you are asleep, and that can be a really tough thing to accept. If you want to successfully navigate working the night shift as a parent, though, you are going to have to learn how to embrace it.

Instead of thinking about the negatives, consider the positives. You’ll make more money and be able to pay off debt faster or surprise your kids with special treats. You’ll get to provide better care for your patients and build stronger relationships with your coworkers.

In addition, you won’t have to deal with things like grocery shopping during the hours when most of the world is awake. Your nonstandard schedule may even enable you to spend more time with your kids.

The Bottom Line For Parents Working The Night Shift

As a parent, you want what’s best for your kids. Often, that means doing things that you don’t really want to do––like working the night shift––in order to provide a better life for them. Working nights isn’t always easy, but there are things that you can do to face the challenges head-on and be a great employee and parent. Use the tips listed above to make life as a night-shift working parent happier and healthier for you.

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About the author:   Adela Ellis is a full-time nurse and part-time ambassador for Infinity Scrubs. Adela attended the University of Arizona and has been a travel nurse for the last 6 years. She enjoys working with different doctors, nurses, and patients from all over the country and blogging about her experiences. In her free time, she loves true-crime podcasts and cooking for friends and family.