7 Essential Items Your Nanny Needs From You

7 Essential Items Your Nanny Needs From You

(This post contains affiliate links.   For more information please see our disclosure policy.)

Going back to work after maternity leave comes to an end can be a daunting, emotional experience.  Just when you have gotten used to spending day after day bonding with your baby and developing a routine – just like that – you have to go back to work.  Much of the time, many moms aren’t even getting close to a decent nights sleep, and what they do get is usually fragmented and interrupted at best.

It is hard to trust another person to come into your home and take care of your precious baby.  After all, you know how to care for your child best, where the diapers are,  when they need to eat, what to feed them, where and what time they sleep, and what their favorite snuggle blanket is.  Going back to work is hard, but leaving your baby in the hands of other is so much harder.

The only thing you can do it prepare the best that you can (and remember, its probably way harder for you then it is for them!).

diaper bag with essential items for the nanny

7 Essential Items You Nanny Needs From You

Here is a list of essential items your nanny needs from you so you go back to work without worry:

Nasal Aspirator

Moms know that nasal aspirators are great tool to unplug baby’s tiny nasal passages.  And nanny’s need to have one available so they too can unplug stuffy noses when mom isn’t there.    Because infants nasal passages are so small, having a stuffy nose affects their ability to breathe, eat, and sleep which makes the nasal aspirator an especially important need for the nanny.

First Aid Kit

Having a First Aid Kit available for the nanny is a no-brainier.  Because you just never know if or when an accident might occur.  In addition, let your child’s caregiver know that it is 100% OK for them to call 911 if there is any concern for your child’s safety.    It is always better to be safe then sorry.

Baby Thermometer

Despite what many caregivers think, you cannot measure a baby’s temperature by feeling their forehead or skin.  You need a digital thermometer to accurately measure a bay’s temperature to know whether or not they have a fever.   An easy thermometer like this one make it simple for the nanny or caregiver to assess babies temperature correctly.

Diaper Bag

Initially I didn’t realize that our nanny depended on having a diaper bag as much as I did!  But it makes perfect sense as they need all of the items inside to take care of our child when we were not there:  diapers, diaper cream, wipes, extra clothes, sunscreen, set of extra keys, baby toys, ect…

Our nanny used our diaper bag when we were not there and took it where ever she went with the baby – for a walk or to the park.  This is the exact diaper bag that we have been using for years and it is still is perfect condition, even considering how much wear-and-tear we put on it.

List Of Important Numbers

This is peace of mind at your caregivers fingertips.  Make sure your child’s caregiver has important numbers they might need in an emergency so they can notify your doctor, pediatrician or veterinarian in seconds. 

This card includes areas to write your police, fire, doctor, pediatrician, pharmacy, utility companies, your address & phone numbers, emergency contact names and phone numbers and an area to write other important information.

Bottle Schedule/Sleep Schedule/Poop Schedule

Who knew that establishing a good eat, sleep and poop schedule could be so important?  Since your child’s caregiver probably doesn’t spend as much time with your baby as you do, they need a guideline for what your baby does on a normal basis.

Also, it is a written documentation for you as well so you know what happened with your baby when you get back home.  We used this exact baby journal for the first 10 months of both of our children lives and it was so helpful!

Hidden Key Access

If you have a hidden key outside of your house then it would be wise to show your nanny where it is!  We didn’t show out nanny exactly where we hid our spare outside – and on the one single occasion that she locked the keys inside-  she was unable to find (resulting in my husband having to leave work and let her in).  One thing I have learned is that it is important to have at least one backup plan in place.  And that includes having a spare key that our nanny has access to.

Are there anything other essential items that you would add to this list?  Please leave a comment below!

Additional Recommended Reading:

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Important Emergency Information To Leave With Your Nanny Or Sitter

Important Emergency Information To Leave With Your Nanny Or Sitter

I remember leaving our  10-week-old daughter with a nanny for the first time.  My husband and I were finally going for our first adult evening since becoming parents.   To say I was anxious would be a massive understatement.  I think I texted our nanny at least 3 times before we even got to dinner!
When we arrived home our little Zoe was snuggled up and sleeping soundly.  In fact, I don’t think she even knew we were gone.
A few months later I went back to work as an Emergency Room Nurse, two days a week.  I know that may not seem like much, but my shifts at the hospital are about 13 hours a day.  And that is a long time for a mom to be away from her baby!
So, in the spirit of being overly prepared I made this comprehensive list of important information to leave with the nanny or sitter. It’s displayed right on our refrigerator so you can’t miss it. I want to make sure our nanny has easy access to any important information that she could possibly need in case of an emergency.
Thankfully she has never needed it.  But you never really know when a disaster or other emergency can strike so it is always best to prepare in advance.
nanny with children

Important emergency information to leave with your nanny or sitter:

General information:

  • Names of all family members (include pets in the house)
  • Names of neighbors, and their children
  • Your address
  • A list of your child’s allergies

Specific contact information:

  • Your cell phone number
  • Information about where you will be while you are out
  • The name and phone number of someone else to contact in case of emergency (if you can’t be reached)
  • Local phone numbers for police, fire, poison control, and emergency services
    • Note – make sure your caregiver knows that it is OK for them to call 911 if they are concerned in any way for your child’s safety.  Always better safe than sorry!

Medical information:

  • A photocopy of your child’s health insurance card
  • The name, address, and phone numbers for your child’s pediatrician
  • The name, address, and phone number of a nearby hospital
  • Information about any medication your child takes (including dosage)

Other Information:

  • A list of the house rules (what kids can or can’t eat, bed times, anything that is not allowed, etc.)
  • Homework information, if necessary, in order to help school-age children
  • Show them where to find the first aid kid, flashlights, fire extinguisher and any other emergency preparedness items

Do you have your child’s important information ready for your nanny or sitter? Now would be a great time to gather this information and put in in a handy spot in case of an emergency.

Additional Recommended Reading:

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Baby Proofing Checklist: How An ER Nurse Keeps Her Kids Safer

Baby Proofing Checklist: How An ER Nurse Keeps Her Kids Safer

(This post may contain affiliate links.  You can find my disclosure page here.  I am not a baby proofing expert.  My goal is to encourage parents to think about how they can create the safest environment for their children at home .  Many accidents involving children are preventable.  You can find more information here.)

To all new parents:  just in case you didn’t know, you gotta baby proof your house!  

It all happens so fast.  First, baby starts to roll and crawl.  Then they start “cruising.” And finally, your sweet little bundle of joy takes his or her first Frankenstein steps. And just like that, you have a walker!

Now, I may be just a tad overzealous when it comes to baby proofing our house.  After all, I am an ER nurse and I have seen what can happen when a house isn’t baby proofed.  (To top that off, our our 8 month old baby just started cruising with his Vtech walker. Gasp!)

I wrote this baby proofing checklist in honor of emergency nurses week and my desire to encourage other parents to take an active stance in baby proofing their homes.  If you are anything like us, you may be a tad bit sleep deprived and overwhelmed.  I hope this list helps to make it easier to create a more baby friendly home

Why is having a baby proofing checklist so important?

You would be surprised at how quickly babies can hurt themselves.  The prevention of accidental injuries is the #1 reason why babies need safe physical boundaries in place. 

Think of it like this:  Playtime + baby proofed home = safe space for growth and learning opportunities!

As parents it is our responsibility to make sure our kids are in a safe environment.  Children need a secure place to get messy, play, explore, learn and have fun.  

Here are a few things to consider when baby proofing your home:

#1.  Set up safety gates

One second your baby is playing in one spot, the next they are on the other side of the house trying to open up the cutlery drawer in the kitchen.  Once babies learn how to crawl or walk they can be surprisingly fast!  Safety gates help keep kiddos within a safe area.  Remember that you want to make sure safety gates are screwed into the wall if they are at the top of a staircase.  

Note:  Although safety gates are a great way to keep your baby more safe, it doesn’t mean that they can’t get hurt on them.  A study from 2014 found that as many as 2,000 U.S. kids visit the emergency room for treatments resulting from injuries caused by climbing or falling through gates.  

#2.  Install corner guards and edge bumpers

Although they appear to be just tiny pieces of plastic, corner guards and edge bumpers have been instrumental in preventing a few very BIG injuries.  Why?  Because many corners on tables and shelves are at same height as toddler’s heads when they are standing (or worse, running).  Hello, head injury!

If your toddler runs into the corner of a piece of furniture with a corner guard or edge bumper, they are much less likely to sustain a serious head injury.  We have corner guards on our kitchen table, coffee table, bookshelf edges, fireplace and even our bedroom side tables.  

#3.  Use door nob covers

Doesn’t it seem as if toddlers like to explore in every space you DON’T want them to be?  Toddlers are curious creatures and forbidden places seem exciting to them.  They love testing their boundaries.  Door knob covers are great for keeping little ones out of the areas you don’t want them wandering into.  Especially places like broom closets, bathrooms or out the front door!

Door nob covers just spin in circles if a toddler tries to open it.  But adults can easily open it by squeezing it tightly and turning the knob.

#4.  Install window guards

Screens are not enough to keep a child from falling out of a window.   And if children are able to open a window then there is the possibility of an accident. Children can be resourceful by climbing on furniture or toys to reach windows, so even if you think there is no way they could reach them, window guards are still a good idea. 

Side note:  I don’t love that these window guards do not let me put the windows up all the way.  But I would rather have them in place than risk having a horrible accident.  

#5.  Install safety locks on all cabinets & drawers

Toddlers love exploration and will open up every single drawer and cabinet in your home.  And if there is one that isn’t locked, I assure you, they will find it!  Use safety latches to keep household chemicals, cleaning supplies, and other hazardous things out of the reach of tiny hands.

There are several types of safety locks that you can buy depending on how much you want to spend and how much work you want to put in.  We use the 3M safety locks and they work great. You can install them instantly without any drilling and can uninstall them easily when you no longer need them.

#6.  Use stove knob locks

The kitchen is one of the most dangerous places in the house for a toddler.  There is fire and extreme heat for cooking after all!  It wouldn’t be difficult for a tiny hand to reach up and turn on a stove the moment you are not looking.  Stove knob covers work very much like door knob covers and make it impossible for a toddler to turn on.  

Note: It is a good idea to get into a new habit of using only the rear stove burners to reduce the chances that your little ones can get burned. If you do need to use the front burners always make sure the handles of any pots or pans are facing inwards so that little ones can’t pull them off the stove and sustain a burn injury.

#7.  Install toilet locks

The toilet bowl is a fascinating place for toddlers and they may feel inclined to look inside the bowl to see what is in there.  They may even try and pull themselves up onto the toilet.  However, a toddler’s head is very big in proportion to their body.  The weight of their heads would make it hard to pull themselves out if they accidentally fell in.  So make it impossible for them to pull the lid up with a toilet lock cover.

#8.  Anchor furniture to the wall

It is a good idea to secure all tip-able furniture to the wall.  As toddlers become more mobile they may climb on furniture, such as a book shelf, causing it to tip over.  Secondly, in the event of an earthquake, you don’t want any heavy furniture falling over on the little humans below (we live in California, so we have to think about that here!).  For aesthetics, you can anchor furniture from the back side so you can’t even see it unless you are really looking. 

Did you find this baby proofing checklist helpful?   Leave us a comment and let us know your thoughts!

How To Make A Homemade Emergency Survival Kit

How To Make A Homemade Emergency Survival Kit

*This post contains affiliate links.  For more information about my disclosure policy click here.

September is Emergency Preparedness Month.  Are you ready?

School is back in session for the kids and now is a great opportunity to do a little reorganization and preparation to ensure that your family is ready in case of a catastrophic event.  

As a registered nurse and mom I have become more paranoid in the last few years about natural disasters.  And I’m not alone with my concerns.  If you recall, in 2017 the United States was hit by 3 of the largest hurricanes to have hit the US in over a century.  

In addition, my family lives in Los Angeles County which means our home sits right in the middle of earthquake country. The experts have been saying that we are due for the “big one” at any time. We can’t predict when it will actually happen, of course. But we can do our best to prepare in case it does.

As I write this, I am currently taking inventory of the homemade emergency survival kit I made last September .  And I’m asking my self the same question as I did then:  is my family prepared if we had a major emergency such as a natural disaster or terrorist attack?

What will you do if there is an emergency?

I like to think of myself as a person who is ready for an emergency. After all, I am an emergency room nurse. I’m used to dealing with emergent situations during my twelve hour shifts. In the hospital we have all the training and supplies we need to be ready for (almost) anything.

I have plenty of first aid supplies stashed away in our garage.  And last September I made it a priority to store enough non perishable food and water to last our family for 5 days.  Now I want to reassess and make sure that my emergency food and other supplies are still up to par.  After all, we do have an additional family member, our 7 month old son!

You can buy an emergency supply kit online.

There are lots of websites online that sell emergency supply kits. Many of them cost from $100 up into the thousands, which may not be affordable for some people. In addition, they still may not include all of the supplies you may need such as food, water, medications or other personal items.

If purchasing an emergency supply kit is not an option for you, why not build you own kit and customize it for your needs? I gathered the following information from several websites and I have resources listed at the bottom of this post.

What To Put In A Homemade Emergency Survival Kit:

Water

The CDC and FEMA state that we should have a minimum of a three day supply of water and food for everyone in the family, including pets. This water is for both drinking and sanitation.  Of course it never hurts to prepare with more.

You should have at least the equivalent of 1 gallon of water per person/per day. For our family of (almost) 4 that means we should have at least 12 gallons of water stashed away to have the minimum three day supply.

water bottles on store shelves
The dollar store is a great place to stock up on gallons of emergency water for your DIY emergency kit. In the wake of disaster it is likely that stores will run out of water and other supplies.

Food

It is possible that electricity could be out for several days in an emergency, which means perishables in the fridge and freezer will go bad. Cooking is also difficult without electricity so the foods should be “ready to eat.” In the case of a major emergency non-perishable foods become important for survival.

Emergency food supplies:

  • Canned fruits, veggies
  • Canned beans, pastas
  • Dry cereal, granola
  • Nut butters
  • Trail mix, dried fruits
  • Protein bars, granola bars
  • Non-perishable pasteurized milk
  • Food for infants (formula, jars)
  • Food for pets

The Department of Homeland Security’s website, Ready.gov states that you should try to avoid foods that make you thirsty, so you don’t end up drinking all of your water.


Other emergency supplies:

Keep these items in a designated place in your home and don’t use them unless there is an emergency. You don’t want to go to your stash in the event of a natural disaster to find that portions of your emergency kit are missing.


You can’t plan a disaster. But you can prepare for it.

Take some time this weekend to prepare a homemade emergency survival kit. You will thank yourself later for being responsible and taking care of your loved ones in advance of a disaster.

Are you prepared for a disaster?  What are you going to do today to ensure that your family has what they need to survive?  Leave a comment below!

Resources:

Ready.gov (Department of Homeland Security)

FEMA.gov

CDC Emergency

How To Prepare An Emergency Supply Kit In Case Of A Disaster

How To Prepare An Emergency Supply Kit In Case Of A Disaster

*This post contains affiliate links.  For more information about my disclosure policy click here.

Do you have an emergency supply kit ready to go in a moment’s notice? 

In 2017 the United States was hit by 3 of the largest hurricanes to have hit the US in over a century.  Natural disasters will happen, but it seems as if there have been an unusual amount of them happening all at the same time.

These disasters are devastating. Hundreds of thousands of people have been left without basic resources such as food, water, or electricity and are in total crisis mode.

I had to ask myself, is my family prepared if we had a major emergency such as a natural disaster or terrorist attack?

What will you do if there is an emergency?

Flooded town

One of the best ways to prepare for an emergency is to have an emergency supply kit ready.

We live in Los Angeles County which means our home sits right in the middle of earthquake country. The experts have been saying that we are due for the “big one” at any time. We can’t predict when it will actually happen, of course. But we can do our best to prepare in case it does.

I like to think of myself as a person who is ready for an emergency. After all, I am an emergency room nurse. I’m used to dealing with some level of trauma and bodily injury during my twelve hour shifts. In the hospital we have all the training and supplies we need to be ready for (almost) anything.

I have plenty of first aid disposables stashed away in our garage. Sure, I can start some IV fluids, give CPR, or assist with injuries or first aid. But what about food? Water? Other emergency supplies? I really hadn’t given those much thought.

So this week I set out to research everything that I would need to make sure my family was prepared for disaster at home. I scored the internet long into the night after I put our daughter to bed. I read through FEMA, The CDC and The Department of Homeland Security’s recommendations for what my family would need in the case of an emergency. To my dismay, I realized that were not ready for an emergency.  At all.

You can buy an emergency supply kit online.

There are lots of websites online that sell emergency supply kits. Many of them cost from $100 up into the thousands, which may not be affordable for some people. In addition, they still may not include all of the supplies you may need such as food, water, medications or other personal items.

American Family Safety is a great resource and they have customizable emergency kits for home and school.

If purchasing an emergency supply kit is not an option for you, why not build you own kit and customize it for your needs? I gathered the following information from several websites and I have resources listed at the bottom of this post.

What To Put In A Basic Emergency Supply Kit:

water bottles on store shelves

The dollar store is a great place to stock up on gallons of emergency water. In the wake of disaster it is likely that stores will run out of water and other supplies.

Water

The CDC and FEMA state that we should have a minimum of a three day supply of water and food for everyone in the family, including pets. This water is for both drinking and sanitation. Of course it never hurts to prepare with more.

You should have at least the equivalent of 1 gallon of water per person/per day. For our family of (almost) 4 that means we should have at least 12 gallons of water stashed away to have the minimum three day supply.

Food

It is possible that electricity could be out for several days in an emergency, which means perishables in the fridge and freezer will go bad. Cooking is also difficult without electricity so the foods should be “ready to eat.” In the case of a major emergency non-perishable foods become important for survival.

Emergency food supplies:

trail mix as emergency food

Sealed trail mix is a good non-perishable food to keep in your emergency kit.

  • Canned fruits, veggies
  • Canned beans, pastas
  • Dry cereal, granola
  • Nut butters
  • Trail mix, dried fruits
  • Protein bars, granola bars
  • Non-perishable pasteurized milk
  • Food for infants (formula, jars)
  • Food for pets

The Department of Homeland Security’s website, Ready.gov states that you should try to avoid foods that make you thirsty, so you don’t end up drinking all your water.

Other emergency supplies:

  • Flashlights
  • First aid kit
  • Cash
  • Whistle (to signal for help)
  • Moist towelettes or baby wipes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Can opener
  • Cell phone chargers and backup battery
  • Medications
  • Glasses, contact lens holder and solution
  • Infant needs: diapers, wipes, bottles, formula
  • Fire extinguisher
  • A lighter or matches in a dry container
  • Paper cups, plates, paper towels, utensils
  • Paper, pencil
  • Blankets, warm clothes

Keep these items in a designated place in your home and don’t use them unless there is an emergency. You don’t want to go to your stash in the event of a natural disaster to find that portions of your emergency kit are missing.

You can’t plan a disaster. But you can prepare for it. Take some time this weekend to prepare a basic emergency supply kit. You will thank yourself later for being responsible and taking care of your loved ones in advance of a disaster.

Do you have any additional thoughts on preparing an emergency supply kit? Or have you been through a disaster and have any recommendations to help be further prepared for a catastrophic event?

Sarah, Mother Nurse Love

Resources:

Ready.gov (Department of Homeland Security)

FEMA.gov

CDC Emergency