7 Helpful Tips For Compassion Fatigue In Nursing

7 Helpful Tips For Compassion Fatigue In Nursing

*This post about compassion fatigue in nursing may contain affiliate links.  You can find our disclosure page here.

I first realized that I was experiencing compassion fatigue as a nurse after only two years in the profession.

That’s correct.  After only TWO YEARS, I was already feeling overstressed, exhausted, and cynical about my career.

When my mind finally wrapped itself around this understanding, I thought I’ve barely graduated with my BSN, and I’m ALREADY burned out? How am I going to continue in the nursing profession for an entire career?  

I was frustrated, confused, and, to be honest, a little heartbroken.  I was passionate about helping others, and I did enjoy the mental stimulation that I got as a nurse.  But I couldn’t figure out how there were nurses on our unit who had been doing the same thing for the last 5, 10 or even 20 years.  Didn’t they feel the same way?

Lately, I have spoken with a lot of nurses about their experiences with compassion fatigue. The truth of the matter is that most, if not all, nurses feel spent and exhausted at some point throughout their careers.

What is compassion fatigue in nursing?

Simply put, compassion fatigue is the gradual lessening of compassion over time due to extreme caregiver stress and overwork.  Compassion fatigue in nursing is also almost always tied to the chronic stress that comes with working 12-hour shifts, which can be very physically, mentally, and emotionally challenging, even on a good day.

Unfortunately, compassion fatigue is prevalent in the nursing profession.  But with awareness and the willingness to make a change, it is possible to overcome this chronic, stressful state and learn to thrive within your nursing career again.

Here are seven tips to help deal with compassion fatigue in nursing:

 1.  Find a better work-life balance

Are you rotating days and nights?   Constantly working overtime?   Or maybe just working too many hours per week?

That may work for a while, but it is not a very good long term plan.  Everyone needs a break, especially nurses.

Consider taking a vacation (or stay-cation) and plan a few solid days of  “me” time.  A little TLC can go a long way.   You simply can’t continue to take good care of others before taking care of yourself first.

Becoming a per diem nurse helped me find a better work-life balance.  What can you do to help balance your life?

2.  Make your health the #1 priority

One of the best things a nurse can do to help prevent nurse burnout is to take good care of themselves.  Often this notion is counter-intuitive to nurses because the nature of their job is to put others’ needs in front of their own continually.  Ask yourself, what do I need to be healthy?  Here are a few suggestions:

  • Take a yoga class or join a gym.
  • Make sure you plan for your 12-hour shifts, so you have healthy snacks while you are at work.
  • Get at least 7-8 hours of uninterrupted sleep before a shift.
  • Try meditation or just sit alone with your eyes closed for 10 minutes during your lunch break.
  • Create a calming environment (at work or home) with a stress-relieving essential oil such as Lavender.

3.  Find the “why” in your compassion fatigue

What is it that is causing you to feel compassion fatigue?  Try writing your thoughts down at the end of a few shifts to help figure out what is overwhelming you.

Is there a pattern?    Perhaps you need to plan your shifts differently.  Are there a few personalities in your workplace that you are not jiving with?

Or, maybe you just are not inspired by your chosen specialty.  Permit yourself to be brutally honest.  If a change is what you need, then make a change.

Additional recommended reading:

 

4.  Challenge yourself

Are you under-challenged at work?  There are so many ways to challenge yourself as a nurse:

  • Become a certified nurse in your specialty (or a completely new specialty!)
  • Take on a charge nurse role.
  • Be a preceptor to novice nurses in your unit.
  • Take on additional committee roles.
  • Attend a nurse conference.
  • Change your nursing specialty.
  • Consider advancing your nursing degree.

5. Surround yourself with positive support

Compassion fatigue and nurse burnout are so common among nurses.  Left unchecked, they can lead to mistakes, unhappiness, or even depression.

Share your nursing compassion fatigue struggles with a close comrade from work who can empathize with your effort.   If that doesn’t help, consider talking to a trusted mentor, a therapist, or find a career coach that can help you work your way out of nurse burnout.

Nurses are self-giving creatures by nature, but we must give to our own needs as well.  Crawl out of your shell and start talking it out.

6. Find an outlet

What do you do on your days off that may you happy?  If you don’t have a stress-relieving outlet, then its time to find one.

Is your inner artist craving a creative outlet, such as painting, designing, or even scrapbooking? Does a day on the golf course or an afternoon on the tennis court bring you joy?  Maybe you have been so busy that you have forgotten how wonderfully distracting it can be to become enveloped into an activity that you love to do.

Research has shown that finding a joyful outlet can enhance your mood, increase energy, lower stress levels, and even make your immune system stronger. Find out what makes you happy outside of the nursing profession.

7. Consider new options

Do don’t have to stay in the same place throughout your entire career.  If fact, one of the greatest benefits of becoming a nurse is that there are so many types of nursing careers out there.

Have an honest discussion with yourself about your career.   Are you a med/Surg nurse who has always dreamed of working in the ICU?  Or maybe you are an ER nurse with interest in becoming a flight nurse.  A change in specialty might be what you need to tackle your compassion fatigue as a nurse.

On another note, nurses don’t have to work in a hospital.   Perhaps working in a dermatology office or as a home healthcare nurse would be a better fit. There are so many nursing careers to choose from.   The sky is the limit.  Find your passion!

Additional recommended reading:

4 Helpful Nurse Burnout Prevention Products

4 Helpful Nurse Burnout Prevention Products

(This post about nurse burnout prevention products contains affiliate links.   You can find our disclosure page here.)

Nursing is not a career for the faint of heart. Humans are living longer with more chronic conditions, and nurses are working hard to care for more and more patients. But despite the many challenges, for most of us, nursing is a calling.  We chose this profession so that we could help patients during the most challenging times in their lives.

But who is responsible for taking care of nurses?

The truth is, being a nurse is not for the faint of heart.  It is an extremely physical and emotional career, and nurses deal with stressful situations such as traumatic accidents, chronic illnesses, demanding patients and families, and even death.  We’ve pretty much seen it all and then some.

After all, they don’t say that nurses are on the front line of healthcare for nothing!

Nurse burnout prevention has never been so important.

Nurse burnout prevention needs to be a bigger priority in the profession.  Nurses don’t want to also end up as patients too, but due to lack of time for self-care, it happens.

Fortunately, there are ways that nurses can help to rectify some of the wear-and-tear that we do to our bodies.  By taking care of ourselves first, we can continue to give great attention to our patients and their families.

Stress in the workplace is not going to get easier for many nurses, especially those at the bedside.  Now is the time to put your health needs first.

And you can start by giving yourself a little TLC on your days off.

Helpful nurse burnout prevention products to help manage nursing stress:

These are items I have personally tried, either at work during a 12-hour shift or at home.  Using some of these nurse burnout relief products during and after a 12-hour shift has made a world of difference in how I feel.  I hope these items help you de-stress and take better care of yourself as well.

#1.  Body Back Buddy Self Massager

Body Back Buddy Back Massager, with Poster, Handheld Massage Stick, Trigger Point Massager, Massage Cane (Blue)

 

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How sore are your back, neck, and feet after a busy 12-hour shift?  The Body Back Buddy is a big winner when it comes to loosening up during and after a busy shift.

I was introduced to the Body Back Buddy by a co-worker of mine in the emergency department where I work.  He brought it to work with him as a way to help him loosen his muscles during his night shifts.  At first glance, it looks a little silly, but when he showed me how to use it, I couldn’t believe how great it felt on my neck and back.

It didn’t take long for other nurses to ask if they could use it, mostly out of curiosity.  But it did help loosen up my neck and back and felt amazing on my pressure points.

I liked it so much that I ordered one that day and have been using it at home several times a week ever since.  This is a fantastic product for long- term nurse burnout prevention.

Here are a few features of this self-massage and trigger tool:

  • Full-body self-massager for simple, fast relief 
  • Calm painful muscle knots and aches in your back, neck, shoulders, and more with a few easy moves
  • Effective pressure point therapy eases tension headaches and sore muscles & helps athletes (and nurses!) recover
  • Single-piece rigid construction – very durable

#2.  Cordless Neck Shoulder Back Massager with Heat

Cordless Neck Shoulder Back Massager with Heat, Deep Tissue 3D Kneading Shiatsu Full Body Massager for Neck Back Shoulder Waist Foot Muscle Pain Relief, Best Gifts for Women/Men/Mom/Dad

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During National Nurses Week in 2019, I tried this cordless neck, shoulder, and back massager during my lunch break in the staff room.  I liked it because it stays around the muscles you put it on and doesn’t move around like many self massagers.  It also isn’t very loud and applies just the right amount of pressure to the muscles.

This device is excellent to use during breaks or after a shift at the hospital.  It also doesn’t require much effort to use, which makes it uniquely relaxing.  And it is cordless so that you can use it anywhere.

Here are a few features of the cordless neck, shoulder and back massager with heat:

  • Cordless & hands-free design:  equipped with a built-in rechargeable battery that lasts up to 100 minutes on a full charge.  
  • Advanced heating: The infrared heat provides necessary warmness to ease muscle tension, stress, and promote blood circulation.  It can be turned off manually, but will also shut itself off after 15 minutes of using (to prevent overheating).
  • Full-body relaxation and pain relief:  comes with eight big nodes and eight small nodes, which provides deep tissue massages on your neck, shoulders, upper back, lower back, waist, foot, tights, calves, legs, feet and arms 
  • Adjustable intensity and two massage directions:   The massagers for neck and back cordless have three adjustable intensity levels, which allow you to get suitable pressure to relieve your muscle pain.   And the body massager has built-in bi-directional movement control, which also auto-reverses every minute
  • One year product warranty guarantee

 

#3. Muse: The Brain Sensing Headband

Muse: The Brain Sensing Headband, BlackMuse: The Brain Sensing Headband, Black

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Meditation has changed my life for the better, especially as a stressed-out nurse.  Before I started meditating regularly, I used to have semi-regular anxiety attacks!

The Muse Brain Sending Headband is for someone ready to take their meditation practice to the next level.  If you do not already practice meditation, I wouldn’t even recommend purchasing this device.  (However, if you want to find a helpful way to find stress relief as a nurse I do highly recommend developing your meditation practice).

Many studies have shown benefits from regular meditation, including reduced stress, lowered blood pressure, increased focus and energy, and improved performance in many areas.  And, as nurses, we can use all the stress reduction we can get!

Here is how it works:  The headband fits across the front of your forehead and wraps around your ears.  A metal strip can detect electrical brainwaves. When specific brainwaves are very active, the weather noise increases. As you calm your mind, the weather noise grows fainter and — here is the genius of the device — if you are very calm for several seconds, you can hear birds chirping.   In the end, you get a graph of your performance and a score.

Here are a few features of the Muse Brain Sensing Headband:

  • Makes meditation easy– is like a personal meditation assistant 
  • Muse will guide you to a calm mind:  Sometimes your mind is calm, and sometimes it’s active – Muse will teach you to recognize a quiet mind and help you get there
  • Allows you to immerse yourself in meditation: Put on the Muse headband, plug in your earbuds or headphones, start the app, and close your eyes. Immerse yourself within the sounds of a beach or rain forest
  • Real-time tracking and feedback: While you meditate, Muse measures whether your mind is calm or active, and translates that data into weathers sounds
  • You can review data after each session: After each session, review your data, set goals, and build an enriching meditation practice that gets better every time
  • Comes with a travel safe case
  • What is included: Muse: Brain Sensing Headband, Quick Start Guide, USB Recharge Cable (Earbuds NOT Included)
  • Limited 1-year warranty

 

#4.  Huggaroo Microwavable Neck And Shoulder Wrap

Huggaroo Microwavable Heating Pad for Neck and Shoulders Pain Relief, Stress Relief, Back Pain Relief, Migraine Relief, Headache Relief, Anxiety Relief, Cramps | Reusable Heat Pad/Cooling Neck Wrap

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Like many other nurses, I carry most of my internalized stress in my neck and shoulders. This, combined with too much computer work and lifting and pulling patients, often leaves my neck in knots, and sometimes the pain keeps me from being able to relax completely.

For the longest time, I used a regular old heating pad on my neck and back- but the one I had didn’t conform well to my body.  So one day, I was looking through Amazon for something to help my neck and back pain, and I came across the Huggaroo.

The design is versatile; if I don’t want it on my back, I fold it up, so it’s concentrated on my neck, and I also like to put in on my chest, almost like a weighted blanket.  The quality is excellent, and the fabric is plush but durable. It’s a frequently used staple in our house. I also take it with me when I travel as well!

Here are a few features of the Huggaro Microwavable Heating Pad:

  • Delivers deep, penetrating, moist heat wherever applied
  • Melts away pain, tension, and stress with heat, soothing aromatherapy, and deep pressure stimulation
  • The perfect heating pad for cramps, neck pain relief or joint pain relief
  • Use as a cold compress to alleviate migraine headaches or a cold pack to soothe strains or a fever
  • Huggaroo is a market leader, featured in Forbes, Women’s Health, Inc, Parade, Reader’s Digest, etc.

In conclusion

Nurse burnout prevention is possible and we need to manage our stress better, so we don’t end up as patients ourselves.   By setting aside a little time every day to relax and de-stress, you will be a happier, healthier nurse and better role model for patients.

After all, everybody wins when nurses are taken care of too!!

Additional recommended reading:  

 

9 Personal Self Care Goals I Set For Myself as a Nurse

9 Personal Self Care Goals I Set For Myself as a Nurse

As s a nurse I have been exposed to so many stressful situations.  I’ve been cussed at by angry patients (more times then I can count), swung at, kicked, had a full urinal thrown at me, been exposed to, been in the middle of dozens of violent patient situations and take-downs, and been the victim of nurse bullying.

In addition, I see other nurses being treated poorly from patients, family members, doctors and even sometimes other nurses.  In fact, it’s not even unusual.  And, like other nurses, I am expected to continue giving compassionate patient care without regard to my own well being.

This sacrificial attitude of putting myself last on a very long spectrum of compassionate care is just not going to cut it anymore.  The thought of spending an entire career with this amount of wear-and-tear is frightening.  Something has to give before I completely fizzle and burn to a crisp.

Nurses need to have compassion for themselves too.

I came out of nursing school with equal parts compassion and adrenaline to save lives and make a positive difference in the world!   In fact, I left a very lucrative 10 year medical equipment sales career so I could do just that.  I was determined to advocate for and serve my patients to the best of my ability.  Compassion was one of my greatest strengths.

As an overachiever for most of my life I have always maintained the attitude that I can do anything as long as I try hard enough.  And now, after 7 years as a registered nurse, I am discovering that I am failing at the one thing that actually defines a great nurse:  compassion.

The nurse burnout is real.

What I am currently experiencing is a state of physical and emotional exhaustion that is more extreme than anything that I have ever experienced in my adult life.  I started my nursing career with the determination to give amazing patient care and here I am, 7 years later, losing my compassion.

(And just so you know – this has been hard for me to acknowledge because I have been a “yes” person my entire life.)

There is beauty in the breakdown.

My nursing burnout amplified after the birth of my first child in 2015.  Then, it got even worse after my second child in 2018.  In fact, I started writing regularly again out of desperation to find an outlet for the exhaustion and overwhelming fatigue I was feeling as a nurse and new mom.  My goal was to find more effective ways to take better care of myself and make my life a little easier.  And it actually has helped me find a little reprieve.

But most importantly, it has opened my eyes to the fact that I need to make some huge changes in my life.  Most of all, I need to find my compassion again.  But this time I am unapologetically focusing my compassion on myself, first.

So, in light of this discovery, I am 100% accepting and honoring these uncomfortable feelings.  I am using them as a catalyst to make changes in my professional and personal life.  My mental and physical pain will be an opportunity for growth and finding self-compassion.

9 Personal Nurse Self Care Goals

I rarely take the time to do nothing and reflect. This is a good year for more of that.

I am on a mission for self-compassion.

You know how when you fly in an airplane, there is the safety warning before take-off?  Passengers are instructed to put the oxygen mask on themselves first, then help others around them.  Because if you pass out from lack of oxygen, you’re not helpful to anyone!

So, here is me putting the oxygen mask on myself first.  Some of the changes I am making are professional and some are personal.  But they are all things I have been wanting to do for a really long time but haven’t because I was thinking about others’ needs before my own.

Here are my new personal nurse self-care and self-compassion goals:

#1. Work two 12 hour shifts a week instead of three

This one is hard for me because it equates to a significant decrease in pay (and I really like money!).  With two toddler age children, child care is our biggest expense (besides housing) and it’s not going away any time soon.  But fortunately, we are in a position to afford it for the time being and I want to use the extra day off to spend more one-on-one time with my adorable babies.

In addition, since most hospital shifts are 12 to 13 hours I don’t get to see my children at all on the days that I work.  I am also staying away from working back-to-back shifts because I just don’t want to be away from my children for more than one day at a time.

#2.  Work fewer holidays and as few weekends as possible

After I had children I really hated having to work on holidays.   I have missed so many birthdays, Easters, 4th of Julys, Thanksgivings, Christmas and New Years to be working at the hospital.  At some point, I started to resent missing that time with my family.  Working on holidays is the norm for many nurses, and I expect to work some.  But since I will be working a little less anyway this will also equate to working fewer holidays as well.  The same goes for weekends.

9 Personal Self Care Goals I Set For Myself As A Nurse

Self Care for nurses is more important now than ever.

#3.  Continue working per diem

There are a lot of benefits and drawbacks to being a per diem nurse.  For example, I love that I can schedule myself to work on the exact days I WANT to work.  However, it also means that if I am not needed then I get canceled at 0400 and then I don’t make any money for that day.  And since I end up paying for a nanny regardless, that’s a double whammy.

The best part of being a per diem nurse is that it offers me a much better work-life balance.  When I worked as a career nurse it was almost impossible for me to secure childcare because my work schedule was always changing.  Some weeks I got the schedule I needed and others I didn’t. So on the whole, being a per diem nurse is the right choice for me and my family.

#4.  Continue writing and growing my website to help other nurse moms

In 2016 I became a nurse blogger.   My venture was born out of my frustration with burnout as a registered nurse and my desire to create a more flexible work-life balance.  Writing about nurse lifestyle topics that interest me and exploring ways that nurses can take better care of themselves helps me to take care of myself better too.

My little blog is even starting to make a small monthly income, which absolutely thrills me.  I have a dream that if I keep working hard my website will make enough money that I can work one day a week instead of two.

#5.  Take a comprehensive course in website management and blogging

Last week I signed up for a comprehensive blogging course that will probably take me the next 6-8 months to complete.  I honestly haven’t been more excited to do something for myself like this in a really long time.  In fact, I can’t wait to see my progress over the next year!

#6.  Explore other medical-related career options

A few weeks ago I interviewed for an aesthetic sales position.  Although I didn’t end up working for the company, it did open my eyes to the fact that there are so many other great opportunities that I could be interested in and also fit my skill set as a nurse.  A nursing practice can take many forms and I am giving myself permission to continue learning about other nursing career options.

#7.  Focus more energy into my family and friends

One of my New Years resolutions this year was to “choose fun.”  So many studies have shown that spending quality time with family and friends is incredibly helpful in decreasing stress and improving burnout symptoms.  Since I will be working a little less I will have more time to focus my energy on the people who matter most to me.

#8.  Enjoy my new fancy gym membership (with childcare on site!)

In the spirit of investing more in myself, I started 2019 off with a gym membership.  It has been a complete game-changer for me.  In fact, the old me would never have never splurged on a fancy gym membership. Making regular time to work out always makes me feel great, clears my head and gives me more stamina.  And my 1 year old loves the Kid’s Club, so it’s a win-win.

As a nurse and mom, my life basically revolves around caring for everyone else, and I am SO GRATEFUL to be able to do that.  But if there is one thing I have learned through my own compassion fatigue it is that I need to put the same care into myself as I do into my patients and family.  So in the spirit of self-compassion, I am metaphorically putting on my oxygen mask first, before helping those around me.

#9.  Practice more yoga

I have been regularly practicing yoga for 14 years.  Finally, in 2o15 I completed Yoga Works’ 4 month Urban Zen Integrative Therapy program for medical professionals.  I learned how to teach simple yoga, do guided meditation and perform Reiki.  It was amazing!

However, in recent years I have not been practicing as much as I would like, and that is going to change.  My goal is to incorporate yoga into my busy schedule every single day. Even if it’s just for 10 minutes.  Yoga helps me stay balanced in times of great stress, gives me flexibility (both physically and mentally) and has been extremely grounding.  In fact, I recently started teaching my 3-year-old daughter a series of yoga poses and it is bringing us both great joy!

9 Personal Nurse Self Care Goals

These two are already happy about self-care goal #1:  Work two 12 hour shifts a week instead of three.  Job flexibility has never been so important to me.

In conclusion

Nurse self-care matters.  If we don’t care for ourselves then how can we expect patients to listen to our health advice and education?  I am taking this opportunity to give myself compassion and hopefully lead others by example.

If other nurses find themselves feeling as unappreciated and burnt out as me I encourage them to find ways to care for themselves first.  Otherwise, we are perpetuating a broken system that does not acknowledge that nursing burnout is a real issue and ignoring nurse health and well being.

So nurse, what are you going to do to take care of yourself today? Leave a comment!

Additional Recommended Reading:

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Simple Stress Management For Nurses

Simple Stress Management For Nurses

(This post about simple stress management for nurses may contain affiliate links. See our disclosure page for more information.)

Nurses are more stressed-out than ever.

It is no surprise that prolonged stress damages the body.  Yet many nurses are dealing with unchecked, chronic stress for years, or even decades.  Still, the passion that many nurses have for helping others drives them to continue forward in their nursing careers.  But who is helping nurses?

The unfortunate truth is that nurses themselves are the ones who must take care of themselves first.   Nurse safety and well-being are not being taken seriously by the very own hospitals where we work so hard and strive to give only the very best patient care.   Nationwide, it appears that hospital administrator’s main priority is making money for the hospital, and the health and well-being of their nurses doesn’t even make the list.

Nurse Stress Relief And Coping Tips

Simple stress management for nurses

Do some hospitals see nurses as indispensable?

For some nurses, it may feel like it.  Even I have felt that despite my own dependability, clinical knowledge, and positive attitude that it wouldn’t matter in the slightest if I left.    The feeling is disheartening.

For example, I became a per diem nurse after the birth of my first child because a unit director stated that they were “unable” to give me consistent scheduling so I could plan daycare for my child.  Per diem nursing gives me the flexibility to schedule my days to fit my childcare situation; however, now I have no benefits, no disability, no retirement, and no maternity leave – and I had another baby this year!  Needless to say, it was a hyper-expensive year for us and caused a lot of stress for me.

But, they knew another nurse would come along and fill my spot.  So why be flexible with my schedule so that I could stay?

I still have a passion for nursing, despite the stress.

Workplace stress in nursing is common.  I am not leaving the profession soon because my children are still very small, and I still do have a strong desire and passion for helping others.  So in the meantime, I make stress management a huge priority in my life.

If you are a nurse who feels like me, keep an eye out for nurse burnout symptoms that could be wreaking havoc on your overall health and happiness.  And start taking simple steps to help keep stress in check, so you don’t end up as a patient yourself.  Nurses shouldn’t be creating unhealthy habits to cope with their stressful nursing careers.  And if it becomes too much where your health is severely being affected negatively, then consider other nursing options away from the bedside.  Nurse, you need to take care of yourself first!

Simple Stress Management Techniques For Nurses:

1.  Watch a funny movie

When was the last time you had a good laugh?  Do you even remember how good it feels to laugh out loud?  Watching a funny movie is a great way to passively tune out and focus on something more light-hearted.  Especially for nurses who deal with immense stress in the workplace.

Studies show that laughter is so good for your health.  A good laugh relieves physical tension and stress, leaving your muscles relaxed for up to 45 minutes after.  Also, laughter increases your immune system by decreasing stress hormones and increasing immune cells and infection-fighting antibodies, thus improving your resistance to disease.

Laughter makes people feel good, which is precisely what stressed-out nurses need.   It releases endorphins, the body’s natural feel-good chemicals. Studies show that laughter has the power to promote an overall sense of well-being and can even temporarily relieve pain.

Woman watching a funny movie and laughing

2.  Get moving:  endorphins are natural stress reducers

Get your heart rate up on your days off!  The benefits of exercise have been well documented is essential for nurse self-care.  It is no secret that regular exercise helps control weight, boosts overall energy, improves your mood, and helps decrease stress levels.  Not only does exercise benefit the nurse personally, but it also allows nurses to have the stamina to give better care to patients as well.

Need to blow off some steam after a stressful day? A brisk 30-minute walk can help. Physical activity stimulates various brain chemicals that may leave you feeling happier and more relaxed.  Which, in turn, will help manage caregiver burden and help you feel your best.

3.  Yoga:  learn the art of how to relax

Yoga is a great stress management tool for nurses. Compassion fatigue can be overwhelming for nurses, and learning how to use yoga for relaxation can help.

study published in Workplace Health & Safety on yoga for self-care and burnout prevention of nurses found that yoga participants “reported significantly higher self-care as well as less emotional exhaustion upon completion of an 8-week yoga intervention.” While the control group demonstrated no change throughout the course of the study, the yoga group showed a significant improvement in scores for self-care, mindfulness, and emotional exhaustion outcomes.

Nurse self-care in the form of yoga is scientifically proven to be beneficial:

  • Stress management.  A study published in the National Institute of Biotechnology Information investigated the effects of yoga on stress coping strategies of ICU nurses. After only eight weeks of yoga, the results showed that the participating ICU nurses had significantly better focus coping strategies and a significant reduction in perceived mental pressure.  (If that is what can happen after only eight weeks, imagine the impact a regular, permanent yoga practice could have on stress management levels!).
  • Prevent or eliminate chronic low back pain.  Chronic back pain in the nursing population is a common ailment. An evidenced-based review at the Texas Women’s University reported that estimates of chronic low back pain among nurses range from 50%-80%.  Yoga not only increases flexibly but increases muscle strength and prevents injuries such as chronic lower back pain.
  • Prevent burnout and compassion fatigue:  study published in Workplace Health & Safety on yoga for self-care and burnout prevention of nurses found that yoga participants “reported significantly higher self-care as well as less emotional exhaustion upon completion of an 8-week yoga intervention.”

Woman doing child's pose.

4.  Have a social life

Good friends can help you manage chronic stress.  It is essential to find balance when you work as a nurse, and that includes making time for friendships and a social life outside of the hospital.

Nurses with strong social support have a reduced risk of many significant health problems, including depression, high blood pressure, and an unhealthy body mass index.  Talking with other nurses who are struggling with the same stressors, you are can help provide support when you need it most.

Having a good social support group can help in many other ways:

  • Increase your sense of belonging and purpose as a nurse
  • Boost your happiness and reduce your stress
  • Improve your self-confidence and self-worth
  • Help you cope with traumatic situations in the workplace, such as patient deaths and abusive or combative patient situations
  • Supportive friendships can encourage you to change or avoid unhealthy lifestyle habits, such as excessive drinking or lack of exercise

5.  Meditate

Meditation is the practice of focusing your mind on a particular thought or activity to achieve a mentally clear and emotionally calm state.  It is claimed to reduce stress, anxiety, and burnout, and enhance resilience.  And stressed-out nurses working long, arduous shifts with often changing schedules need this more than anyone.

A few benefits of meditation:

  • Decreased burnout
  • Better focus and ability to ignore distractions
  • Boost compassion
  • Better sleep
  • Stress relief
  • Happier state of mind



Headspace is an app for your phone that has many different meditations, each lasting 10 to 60 minutes. If you can find 10 minutes in your day, then you have no excuse not to meditate!  Meditation is attainable for even the busiest of nurses!

Like yoga, meditation is a practice. There is no good or bad. It is just what it is at the time. You can keep practicing to train your mind to do better the next time. And then eventually your brain is rewired by the habitual repetition of meditation, and it becomes easier.

It is not uncommon for hospitals to have a space for spiritual prayer or meditation for patients and their families.  However, nurses should also be offered a meditative space to clear their heads and have a quiet moment to themselves.  This would help nurses return to their work environments with renewed energy and focus on giving better patient care.

Women meditating on bed

6.  Eat nutritious foods

Nurse break rooms are notorious for having sugary snacks like donuts, cookies, or other unhealthy junk food all within an arms reach.  Sweets are so tempting to nibble on when you are tired and need a little extra energy.  But then a few moments later you crash and are even more tired.   On another note, eating nutritious and easy snacks will keep you energized during a 12-hour shift. 

Pack snacks like these in your lunch bag to help keep your blood sugar levels balanced during your shift:

  • Baby carrots, broccoli or other veggies & hummus
  • Celery and almond butter
  • Strawberries, blueberries
  • Granola and yogurt
  • Almonds or cashews
  • Avocado toast
  • Sliced apples and peanut butter
  • Cottage cheese with pineapple or banana
  • Trail mix

Tips for nurses to make healthy meals fast:  Try making a big batch of quinoa, brown rice, or black bean pasta to have handy in the fridge.  These are a few great staples that you can build a nourishing meal around.  When you get hungry, you can mix in a protein, veggies, nuts or seeds, dried fruits, or even just enjoy them with a little olive oil and sea salt.   The key is to have healthy food that is easy to prepare BEFORE you get super hungry.

P.S.  HEY, NURSES!  Remember to grab your FREE E-Book “The Nurse’s Guide To Health & Self Care” below! (scroll down)

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Simple Time Saving Tips For Nurse Moms

Simple Time Saving Tips For Nurse Moms

(This post about time saving tips for nurse moms contains affiliate links.  You can find my disclosure page here.  To contact us regarding collaboration click here).

To the mom who is a nurse:  You’ve got amazing skills and you are beyond capable of running the world.

At work you are busy caring for patients, organizing plans of care, giving life-saving treatments, advocating for patients, all while continuing to make them feel safe and well-cared for.  Now its time to apply your nurse time management skills at home.  After all, nurses know more then anyone about how to prioritize the most important tasks first.  Our patients lives often depend on it.

Simple Time Saving Tips For Nurse Moms

No one has the ability to multi-task the way a nurse does.  Here are a few time saving tips and tools to help you apply those talents as a mom managing a household:

Simple Time Saving Tips For Nurse Moms:

1.  Have your to-do list in your phone

I love planners because I think they are pretty.  Problem is, when you have children you almost never get a chance to look at them.  Which is why I have found it necessary to keep my to-do lists organized in my phone where I can easily see them.

Here are a few awesome apps to stay organized:

  • Trello:  This is my favorite!
  • Google Tasks:  simple tasks in Gmail and Google Calendar
  • Google Keep:  A bulletin board for your tasks
  • Remember The Milk:  very simple yet powerful task management

2.  Make preparing lunches and family meals easy

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3.  Listen to podcasts for perspective on nursing, motherhood, parenting and lifestyle tips

Podcasts are a great way to add a little adult conversation to your day.  After the birth of my first baby I seriously missed reading books.  So, I would take my daughter for long walks and listen to podcasts for hours.  I was able to walk off my baby weight relatively fast and learn about ways to make my life easier in the process.

Here are a few of my favorite podcasts:

4.  Make it super simple to tidy up your home

I remember people telling me just to “let things go” after I had a baby.  Then I heard it even more after my second baby.  I think this might be the worst advice I have ever gotten as a new mom.  Who feels better when their lives and homes are a complete disaster?  Not me.

I have found though the years that its easier to keep my home clean and organized when I don’t keep things that we are not using or providing a helpful service to us.  Basically, if its not being used, then its got to go.  Here are two books I read that inspired me to declutter our home and keep it that way:

5.  Make family photo books in 20 minutes with Chatbooks

ChatBooks is a mobile app where you can pick photos from your social media accounts or mobile device and have them printed in a pretty book.   Chatbooks are photo books for people who don’t have time to make photo books (ahem, nurse moms!)  You can easily add, edit, and rearrange your favorite photos to create a beautiful photo book.

Before I had children I had the time to spend hours making photo books and  ordering pictures.  Now that I have children, I want to document everything they do and make hard copy books for our family and ourselves.  Problem is, there just isn’t time anymore!  Chatbooks has been the best and easiest solution for this problem.

Every few months I go through my phone and make a new book.  I have books for both of my children first year of life, all of our family photoshoots, vacations, and other special events.  Plus, it has made it so easy to make great birthday and holiday gifts for grandparents as well.

6.  Get off social media

Limiting social media is simply one of the best time saving tips there is!  There is nothing more time wasteful then scrolling through social media or constantly uploading photos.

Focus on whats most important to you.  Besides, studies say that people who look at social media are likely to become more depressed.  And if your are a busy working mom, you have got no time for that!

I try and focus on any of these productive tasks instead of mindlessly using social media:

  • being a wife
  • raising an amazing kid
  • spending time with friends
  • writing in this blog
  • cooking
  • cleaning
  • reading
  • listening to music or a podcast
  • meditating
  • practicing yoga
  • sleeping
  • relaxing

Recently, I was reading an article about an author named Tim Ferris who wrote a book called The 4-Hour Workweek. He talked a lot about how being perpetually busy just for the sake of business is actually a form of laziness. Ferris explained that on a superficial level, being busy is a satisfying substitute for doing important work. “It’s very easy to confuse activity with productivity,” says Ferris.

This got me thinking…  Is my addiction to social media just me being lazy?  Am I unconsciously browsing social media instead of living my life with intention?  This realization inspired me to do an experiment and quit all forms of social media for one week.  And guess what?…  I survived!  And I was motivated me to limit myself to checking my social media accounts 1-2 times a week from then on.

I have so much more time now to focus on things that actually serve me well.

I hope these time saving tips inspired you to be more productive and purposeful.  Now, continue doing what you do best and continue running the world!

Additional Recommended Reading By Mother Nurse Love:

Fit Nurse:  Simple Ways To Exercise As A Busy Nurse Mom

Fit Nurse: Simple Ways To Exercise As A Busy Nurse Mom

To the nurse who is also a momIt is possible to find time for exercise, but you are going to need to get creative.  Being a nurse mom is challenging, and it’s all about finding balance.

Long gone are the days when I could leisurely wake up naturally and decide whether I wanted to take the 9 a.m. or the 11 a.m. yoga class or when I would put my running clothes on in the afternoon and lay around until I “felt ready” to head out for my jog, sometimes several hours later.

Before becoming a nurse and mom, I used to put a lot of thought into the location of my runs.  Where would I go today?  The beach? Or to the running trail? I never even thought about how long I would be out. I just ran until I felt tired and then called it a day.

Now I’m lucky if I get to squeeze in a 20-minute run after I put the kids down at 8 PM.  And by that time, I’m usually so tired I can barely muster the energy to get out the front door!

For the record, I am happier now than I think I have ever been.  I wouldn’t change anything about all of the blessings in my life that make me so incredibly busy.  I LOVE being a mom and an ER nurse.  But, as a healthcare professional and a person who enjoys a little self-care here and there, I am all too aware that I need to get regular exercise if I want to keep my sanity intact.

Woman doing a plank

What are the simplest ways to exercise as a busy nurse mom?

Over the last month, I have been interviewing fellow nurses to find out how they squeeze in a workout while balancing motherhood and 12-hour shifts.  Some of the feedback I received was very encouraging!  The conversations I had with these nurses convinced me that it is, in fact, very possible to stay fit when it seems that there is no more time in the day.

For me, finding time for fitness has been a trial and error project.  Over the past three years (since my first baby was born), I have tried several methods to squeeze workouts into an already crammed work/life schedule.  Some of these methods worked, some I tried but didn’t stick to, and some never came to fruition.

My journey to stay fit, along with the information shared with me by my fellow nurse comrades, revealed four primary ways that nurse moms can successfully find time to exercise.

Simple ways to exercise as a busy nurse mom

It is possible to find ways to exercise as a busy nurse mom.  Be creative!

Fit nurse tip #1.  Work out before the kids get up.

Before kids, I never in a million years would have dreamed that I would be awake in time to make it to a 6 AM hot yoga class.  But free time is sparse now.  If I don’t make time somewhere, then it won’t happen. It’s as simple as that.

The good news is that when I drag myself out of bed early for a workout, then I feel amazing for the rest of the day.  Sure, I’m tired, but I would be even more tired if I didn’t exercise at all.  By starting my day with a yoga-induced rush of endorphins, not only do I feel better, but I am so much more productive throughout the day.

My goal is to make it to a 6 a.m. class at least two times during the week on the days I don’t work.  Also, I am usually able to fit one early morning class on the weekend as well.  Sometimes it ends up being only once a week, and sometimes if I’m lucky, all three.  But something is always better than nothing!

Fit nurse tip #2.  Work out on your lunch break.

A nurse friend of mine changes into running clothes and goes for a jog during her lunch hour.  Talk about dedication to your health!  She says it works for her because she can do it no matter what time her break is.  Additionally, the midday exercise helps break up the day, helps her deal better with stressful patient assignments, and gives her energy for the rest of the shift. And she is a good role model for patients to boot!

(On another note, my husband replaced his lunch hour with an F45 class 3 times a week.   Although he is not a nurse, he is a busy working parent nonetheless. The benefits for him are so obvious. He is noticeably better able to manage work stress and comes home with significantly more energy at the end of a busy workday. And he says he feels a lot better too!)

Fit nurse tip #3.  Work out after the kids go to bed.

I know a lot of nurse parents who make it to the gym or a yoga class after working a 12-hour shift.  This seems to be the most popular time for many parents because the kids are in bed and it’s an excellent time to work off the stress from the day.  It is an effective way to put the day behind you and do something for yourself after spending 12 hours putting patients’ needs first.

On occasion, I will try to go out for a run or a walk if I still have a little energy left in me, usually during the summer months when the days are a little longer.   Unfortunately, it is also typically when I am the most tired, and I just want to crawl into bed with a book and fall asleep. But I do love listening to music and disconnecting for a little while after a long shift, and a quick run is a relatively easy way to do that!

A post-work run for me is usually pretty quick, 20-25 minutes max.  Unfortunately, if I run too long, then I risk not being able to fall asleep, and there’s not much worse than that.  After all, sleep is essential to the already sleep-deprived parent!

Fit nurse tip#4.  Try squeezing in exercise during the days when you are at home with your kids.

Finding new ways to exercise as a busy nurse mom requires some thinking outside the box.  Why not try squeezing in a workout when you are at home with the kids during the day? Besides, isn’t taking care of a baby or toddler already a kind of workout in itself?

Here are a few ways to exercise with kids in tow:

  • Turn on a workout video in the living room (good when the weather is poor!)
  • Take the kids for a walk in the stroller
  • Take a stroller strides class with other moms
  • Run around with the kids on the playground
  • Kick a soccer ball around with the kids
  • Try teaching your kids with a Gaiam yoga video (watching my daughter practice yoga just melts my heart!)
  • Turn up the music and dance with the kids (it just doesn’t get more fun than that!)

How do you find ways to exercise as a busy nurse mom?   I very much enjoy hearing about ideas of what others are doing.  Feel free to leave a comment!

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