9 Personal Self Care Goals I Set For Myself as a Nurse

9 Personal Self Care Goals I Set For Myself as a Nurse

As s a nurse I have been exposed to so many stressful situations.  I’ve been cussed at by angry patients (more times then I can count), swung at, kicked, had a full urinal thrown at me, been exposed to, been in the middle of dozens of violent patient situations and take-downs, and been the victim of nurse bullying.

In addition, I see other nurses being treated poorly from patients, family members, doctors and even sometimes other nurses.  In fact, it’s not even unusual.  And, like other nurses, I am expected to continue giving compassionate patient care without regard to my own well being.

This sacrificial attitude of putting myself last on a very long spectrum of compassionate care is just not going to cut it anymore.  The thought of spending an entire career with this amount of wear-and-tear is frightening.  Something has to give before I completely fizzle and burn to a crisp.

Nurses need to have compassion for themselves too.

I came out of nursing school with equal parts compassion and adrenaline to save lives and make a positive difference in the world!   In fact, I left a very lucrative 10 year medical equipment sales career so I could do just that.  I was determined to advocate for and serve my patients to the best of my ability.  Compassion was one of my greatest strengths.

As an overachiever for most of my life I have always maintained the attitude that I can do anything as long as I try hard enough.  And now, after 7 years as a registered nurse, I am discovering that I am failing at the one thing that actually defines a great nurse:  compassion.

The nurse burnout is real.

What I am currently experiencing is a state of physical and emotional exhaustion that is more extreme than anything that I have ever experienced in my adult life.  I started my nursing career with the determination to give amazing patient care and here I am, 7 years later, losing my compassion.

(And just so you know – this has been hard for me to acknowledge because I have been a “yes” person my entire life.)

There is beauty in the breakdown.

My nursing burnout amplified after the birth of my first child in 2015.  Then, it got even worse after my second child in 2018.  In fact, I started writing regularly again out of desperation to find an outlet for the exhaustion and overwhelming fatigue I was feeling as a nurse and new mom.  My goal was to find more effective ways to take better care of myself and make my life a little easier.  And it actually has helped me find a little reprieve.

But most importantly, it has opened my eyes to the fact that I need to make some huge changes in my life.  Most of all, I need to find my compassion again.  But this time I am unapologetically focusing my compassion on myself, first.

So, in light of this discovery I am 100% accepting and honoring these uncomfortable feelings.  I am using them as a catalyst to make changes in my professional and personal life.  My mental and physical pain will be an opportunity for growth and finding self-compassion.

9 Personal Nurse Self Care Goals

I rarely take the time to do nothing and reflect. This is a good year for more of that.

I am on a mission for self-compassion.

You know how when you fly in an airplane, there is the safety warning before take-off?  Passengers are instructed to put the oxygen mask on themselves first, then help others around them.  Because if you pass out from lack of oxygen, you’re not helpful to anyone!

So, here is me putting the oxygen mask on myself first.  Some of the changes I am making are professional and some are personal.  But they are all things I have been wanting to do for a really long time but haven’t because I was thinking about others’ needs before my own.

Here are my new personal nurse self-care and self-compassion goals:

#1. Work two 12 hour shifts a week instead of three

This one is hard for me because it equates to a significant decrease in pay (and I really like money!).  With two toddler age children, child care is our biggest expense (besides housing) and it’s not going away any time soon.  But fortunately, we are in a position to afford it for the time being and I want to use the extra day off to spend more one-on-one time with my adorable babies.

In addition, since most hospital shifts are 12 to 13 hours I don’t get to see my children at all on the days that I work.  I am also staying away from working back-to-back shifts, because I just don’t want to be away from my children for more than one day at a time.

#2.  Work less holidays and as few weekends as possible

After I had children I really hated having to work on holidays.   I have missed so many birthdays, Easters, 4th of Julys, Thanksgivings, Christmas and New Years to be working at the hospital.  At some point I started to resent missing that time with my family.  Working on holidays is the norm for many nurses, and I expect to work some.  But since I will be working a little less anyway this will also equate to working less holidays as well.  Same goes for weekends.

#3.  Continue working per diem

There are a lot of benefits and drawbacks to being a per diem nurse.  For example, I love that I can schedule myself to work on the exact days I WANT to work.  However, it also means that if I am not needed then I get canceled at 0400 and then I don’t make any money for that day.  And since I end up paying for a nanny regardless, that’s a double whammie.

The best part of being a per diem nurse is that it offers me a much better work-life balance.  When I worked as a career nurse it was almost impossible for me to secure childcare because my work schedule was always changing.  Some weeks I got the schedule I needed and others I didn’t. So on the whole, being a per diem nurse is the right choice for me and my family.

#4.  Continue writing and growing my website to help other nurse moms

In 2016 I became a nurse blogger.   My venture was born out of my frustration with burnout as a registered nurse and my desire to create a more flexible work-life balance.  Writing about nurse lifestyle topics that interest me and exploring ways that nurses can take better care of themselves helps me to take care of myself better too.

My little blog is even starting to make a small monthly income, which absolutely thrills me.  I have a dream that if I keep working hard my website will make enough money that I can work one day a week instead of two.

#5.  Take a comprehensive course in website management and blogging

Last week I signed up for a comprehensive blogging course that will probably take me the next 6-8 months to complete.  I honestly haven’t been more excited to do something for myself like this in a really long time.  In fact, I can’t wait to see my progress over the next year!

#6.  Explore other medical related career options

A few weeks ago I interviewed for an aesthetic sales position.  Although I didn’t end up working for the company, it did open my eyes to the fact that there are so many other great opportunities that I could be interested in and also fit my skill set as a nurse.  A nursing practice can take many forms and I am giving myself permission to continue learning about other nursing career options.

#7.  Focus more energy into my family and friends

One of my New Years resolutions this year was to “choose fun.”  So many studies have shown that spending quality time with family and friends is incredibly helpful in decreasing stress and improving burnout symptoms.  Since I will be working a little less I will have more time to focus my energy on the people who matter most to me.

#8.  Enjoy my new fancy gym membership (with childcare on site!)

In the spirit of investing more in myself, I started 2019 off with a gym membership.  It has been a complete game changer for me.  In fact, the old me would never have never splurged on a fancy gym membership. Making regular time to work out always makes me feel great, clears my head and gives me more stamina.  And my 1 year old loves the Kid’s Club, so its a win-win.

As a nurse and mom my life basically revolves around caring for everyone else, and I am SO GRATEFUL to be able to do that.  But if there is one thing I have learned through my own compassion fatigue it is that I need to put the same care into myself as I do into my patients and family.  So in the spirit of self-compassion, I am metaphorically putting on my oxygen mask first, before helping those around me.

#9.  Practice more yoga

I have been regularly practicing yoga for 14 years.  Finally, in 2o15 I completed Yoga Works’s 4 month Urban Zen Integrative Therapy program for medical professionals.  I learned how to teach simple yoga, do guided meditation and perform Reiki.  It was amazing!

However, in recent years I have not been practicing as much as I would like, and that is going to change.  My goal is to incorporate yoga into my busy schedule every single day. Even if it’s just for 10 minutes.  Yoga helps me stay balanced in times of great stress, gives me flexibility (both physically and mentally) and has been extremely grounding.  In fact, I recently started teaching my 3 year old daughter a series of yoga poses and it is bringing us both great joy!

9 Personal Nurse Self Care Goals

These two are already happy about self-care goal #1:  Work two 12 hour shifts a week instead of three.  Job flexibility has never been so important to me.

In conclusion….

Nurse self care matters.  If we don’t care for ourselves then how can we expect patients to listen to our health advice and education.  I am taking this opportunity to give myself compassion and hopefully lead others by example.

If other nurses find themselves feeling as unappreciated and burnt out as me I encourage them to find ways to care for themselves first.  Otherwise, we are perpetuating a broken system that does not acknowledge that nursing burnout is a real issue and ignoring nurse health and well being.

So nurse, what are you going to do to take care of yourself today? Leave a comment!

Additional Recommended Reading:

P.S.  HEY NURSES!  Sign up for our newsletter below and get a FREEBIE on us!  

How Fear Is Inspiring My Nursing Career

How Fear Is Inspiring My Nursing Career

I have a confession.  My biggest nursing career fear is working for an hourly wage as a floor nurse forever.

Of course there are other things I fear in my nursing career as well.  Such as staying burned out working 12’s hour shifts, physically being unable to work after decades of wear-and-tear, and not reaching my full career potential.

But the one thing that really keeps me up at night is the idea of not creating a future for myself that has flexibility, freedom, opportunity, and more money.  I have ambition, dammit. And its about time for a big change.

In order for me to make career decisions that will help me reach my fullest nursing career potential moving forward, I thought it was wise to revisit my career history.  What inspired and motivated me in the past?  Where are my strengths and weaknesses?  What are my biggest priorities from here moving forward and how to I reach them?

So, (deep breath) here we go… 

I was once an aspiring writer in college.

Way, way back in the day, before I ever even considered becoming a registered nurse, I was a journalism major with a minor in women’s studies.  I wrote for our student newspaper, The Orion, and I loved it.  I enjoyed the teamwork and even though I felt way in over my head a lot of the time I absolutely loved the challenge.

But then I graduated with a little debt and decided I was tired of being a poor college student.  I wanted money!  After looking at a few options and going on about 50 intense interviews I finally got my first job as a medical device salesperson.

Reflective takeaway:  I have experience working for an award-winning college newspaper.  I enjoyed the challenge and teamwork aspect.

Inspiring nursing career options

They say hindsight is 20/20. Can a deep dive into my career history inspire my future career as a nurse?

In my first career I sold medical devices to hospital operating rooms.

I spent the next decade working in the competitive field of surgical equipment sales for a fortune 100 company and a few medical device startups.  It was intense and I did very well, but there was always a feeling that I could be doing something even more important.  My soul was craving more clinical education and critical thinking.   I remember thinking to myself “I don’t want to work my whole career just being a salesperson!”  I needed a bigger purpose.

So after years of soul searching, I made the difficult decision to leave the field in pursuit of greater clinical medical knowledge.  I went back to school and achieved a BS in Nursing.

Reflective takeaway: I have many valuable professional skills that I can apply to other careers.  And I’m hyper competitive.

I became a second-career nurse.

I began my career specializing on a Neuroscience and Stroke unit and earned certifications as a Stroke Certified Registered Nurse and Public Health Nurse. In 2017, I began a new phase in my nursing career as an Emergency Room RN.

I love that I help others for a living and I enjoy the mental stimulation I get at work during my 12 hour shifts.  Becoming a nurse has even helped me deal with the craziness of motherhood in some ways because it helps me distinguish things that I should be concerned with from things that are not a big deal.  (I have my time on a neuro science floor and as an ER nurse to thank for that!)

However, the physical wear-and-tear and caregiver fatigue has got me feeling completely spent at times.  And upper-management within the hospital is not something I am interested in at all.

Reflective takeaway:  I enjoy using my clinical expertise to help others.  But I also need to make my own health needs a priority.  

I want to be a working mom who makes my own rules. Having children changes everything.

Starting a family intensified my biggest nursing career fear:  a lifetime of working 12 hour shifts at the hospital

Having children really does change everything.  I am grateful for all of the amazing experiences I have had in nursing.  However, I see the future through a different lens now.  My husband and I are currently raising two toddlers and my priorities are forever changed.  My purpose for success so completely different.  Now my reason for success is my family.

And so, here I am seven years into my nursing career and I have this gnawing sensation that I need to “blow up” my career again.  It is time to make room for more professional growth and development.

As a part of this process I made a list of my future career priorities:

  • Cerebral stimulation
  • Being a positive role model for my children
  • Freedom
  • Flexibly
  • Money

Reflective takeaway:   Becoming a parent changed my career priorities and needs.  Work-life balance is key.

Next (baby) steps…

In 2016 I created a nurse mom blog called MotherNurseLove.com.  In the sparse amount of free time I have I am creating a website, writing blog posts and taking courses to hone in on my new craft.   My venture is being crafted out of my love for writing, my business management experience, my clinical knowledge as a nurse and life experience as a mother.  I am creating my own opportunity that is more in line with my current career priorities (as mentioned above).

For clarity, my niche (or at least the niche I am striving to create) is:  “nurse mom lifestyle blogger with an emphasis on nurse self care”  My goal is to write about nurse mom lifestyle topics that interest me and finding helpful ways for nurses to take better care of themselves.

In conclusion

Turning my nursing career fear into a catalyst for growth is a process.   As I grow older (and hopefully wiser!) I am discovering that their are so many paths that nurses can take.  The sky is the limit as long as I work hard and continually open myself to learning new skills.

My ultimate goal:   To create a career for myself were I can combine my journalism degree with my nursing knowledge and motherly experience.  This is the first “career” I have ever had where I didn’t have to fill out an extensive application and interview for the position.  For the very first time, I am warming to the idea of being my OWN boss.  And I’m really looking forward to what the future will hold.

I hope you enjoyed this post.  If you are a nurse who is looking for alternative career options or want to find ways to take better care of yourself as a working mom and RN please join my email list below!

Additional Recommended Reading:

7 Energizing Yoga Poses For Nurses (With Photos!)

7 Energizing Yoga Poses For Nurses (With Photos!)

(This post is not a substitution for medical care.  Please consult with your physician before starting any exercise routine.  This post also contains affiliate links.  You can find my disclosure page here.)

Nurse practicing yoga pose

7 Energizing Yoga Poses For Nurses

What do you think would happen if every nurse did an energizing 20 minute yoga routine before every shift?  

Its likely nurses have a chance to clear their heads, connect with themselves, and give themselves a moment to prepare for the busy 12 hour shift ahead.  Not a bad way to start off the day.

Many nurses may underestimate the physical and mental wear-and-tear of long shifts.  The start the day fueled on cups of coffee and then they are not getting the rest and recovery they need afterward.

So, as nurses we must do the best we can to take care of ourselves the best we can (obviously no one else at the hospital is going to help up out with that).  This includes giving our bodies the rest, rejuvenation and tender love that we give to our patients each shift!  No more self-sacrificing attitudes!

Yoga is a fantastic way for nurses to reconnect with their bodies and make sure they are in a healthy and happy mental state – both before and after a nursing shift.

7 Energizing Yoga Poses For Nurses To Start The Shift Off Right:

#1.  Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

Mountain Pose is a great yoga pose for nurses to start with in the morning. Ground your feet and press evenly through all four corners of each foot.  Stretch your arms towards the floor and draw your abdominals in and up.

Hold for five to eight breaths to get focused and ready to move deeper into your practice.

Benefits of Mountain Pose for nurses:

  • Improves posture
  • Strengthens thighs, knees, and ankles
  • Increases awareness
  • Increases strength and mobility in the feet, legs, and hips
  • Firms abdomen and buttocks

#2. Upward Salute Pose (Urdhva Hastasana)

From Mountain Pose, lift your arms up overhead and press your palms firmly together. Keep the tops of your shoulders released away from your ears and activate your triceps. Keep the abdominals engaged and the legs firm.

Hold for five to eight breaths.

Benefits of  Upward Salute Pose for nurses:

  • Stretches the sides of the body, spine, shoulders, and belly
  • Tones the thighs
  • Improves digestion
  • Helps to relieve anxiety and fatigue.
  • Helps create space in the chest and lungs

#3.  Cat-Cow Pose

Cat Pose

Cat Pose

Start on your hands and knees with your wrists directly under your shoulders, and your knees directly under your hips. Point your fingertips to the top of your mat. Place your shins and knees hip-width apart. Center your head in a neutral position and soften your gaze downward.

Cow Pose:  Inhale as you drop your belly towards the mat. Lift your chin and chest, and gaze up toward the ceiling.

Cat Pose: As you exhale, draw your belly to your spine and round your back toward the ceiling. The pose should look like a cat stretching its back.  Release the crown of your head toward the floor, but don’t force your chin to your chest.

Inhale, coming back into Cow Pose, and then exhale as you return to Cat Pose.

Repeat 5-20 times, and then rest by sitting back on your heels with your torso upright.

Benefits of Cat Cow Pose for nurses:

  • Brings flexibility to the spine
  • Stretches the back torso and neck
  • Softly stimulates and strengthens the abdominal organs
  • Open the chest, encouraging the breath to become slow and deep.
  • Calms the mind
  • Helps develop postural awareness and balance throughout the body and brings spine into correct alignment

#4.  Downward-Facing Dog Pose (Adho mukha svanasana)

Downward-Facing Dog Pose

Downward-Facing Dog Pose

From neutral Cat Cow pose, push your hips up into Downward-Facing Dog Pose.

Press firmly into your hands and roll your up arms outwards. Lengthen up through your torso and keep your abdominals engaged. Actively use your legs to keep bringing your torso back in space.  Bend your knees if needed.

Hold here for eight to ten breaths.

Benefits of Downward-Facing Dog Pose for nurses:

  • Helps build bone density in the arms
  • Builds upper body strength
  • Decreases fatigue
  • Helps to decrease back pain and stiffness.
  • Helps boost circulation by putting your heart above your head

#5.  Warrior I (Virabhadra I)

Warrior I Pose

Warrior I Pose

Step your feet 3 1/2 to 4 feet apart. Raise your arms perpendicular to the floor (and parallel to each other), and reach your hands actively towards the ceiling. Firm your scapulas against your back and draw them down toward the coccyx.

Turn your left foot in 45 to 60 degrees to the right and your right foot out 90 degrees to the right.  Align the right heel with the left heel. Rotate your torso to the right, squaring the front of your pelvis to the front of your mat. As the left hip point turns forward.  Lengthen your coccyx toward the floor, and arch your upper torso back slightly.

Exhale and bend your right knee over the right ankle so the shin is perpendicular to the floor Reach strongly through your arms, lifting the rib cage away from the pelvis.

Stay for 30 to 60 seconds and switch sides.

Benefits of Warrior I Pose for nurses:

  • Stretches the chest and lungs, shoulders and neck and belly
  • Strengthens your shoulders, arms, legs, ankles and back
  • Strengthens and stretches the thighs, calves, and ankles
  • Opens yours hips, chest and lungs.
  • Improves focus, balance and stability
  • Energizes the whole  body

#6.  Forward Fold (Uttanasana)

Forward Fold Pose

Forward Fold Pose

Stand in Mountain Pose with your hands on your hips.  Exhale as you bend forward at the hips, lengthening the front of your torso. Bend your elbows and hold on to each elbow with the opposite hand. Let the crown of your head hang down. Press your heels into the floor and lift your sit bones toward the ceiling. Turn the tops of your thighs slightly inward. Don’t lock your knees.

Engage your quadriceps and draw them up toward the ceiling.  Bring your weight to the balls of your feet. Keep your hips aligned over your ankles. Let your head hang.

Hold the pose for up to one minute. To release, place your hands on your hips. Keep your back flat as you inhale and return to Mountain Pose. Repeat 2-5 times.

Benefits of Forward Fold for nurses:

  • Helps to relieve stress, headaches, anxiety, fatigue, mild depression, and insomnia
  • Stretches and lengthens your hamstrings and calves
  • Opens the hips and can relieve tension in the neck and shoulders.

#7.  Child’s Pose (Balasana)

Child's Pose

Child’s Pose

Child’s Pose is a beginner’s yoga pose often performed to rest between more difficult poses. The position stretches the thighs, hips and ankles and helps relax the body and mind.

Kneel on the floor with your toes together and your knees hip-width apart. Rest your palms on top of your thighs.

On an exhale, lower your torso between your knees. Extend your arms alongside your torso with your palms facing down. Relax your shoulders toward the ground. Rest in the pose for as long as needed.

Benefits of Child’s Pose for Nurses:

  • Stretches the hips, thighs, and ankles
  • Reduces stress and fatigue
  • Relaxes the muscles on the front of the body
  • Elongates the lower back
  • Improves digestion
  • Calms the mind
  • Rests the body

Care for yourself first through yoga, then care better for patients afterwards.

Nurses must get into the practice of taking good care of themselves first, so they can continue to take great care of patients as well.  After all, nurses serve as role models for our patients.   If we don’t take our own health advice, why should our patients listen to us about anything else?

A good way to start is by practicing these energizing pre-shift yoga poses for nurses.  And then see how much better you feel heading into your shifts!

Essential yoga props to start your yoga practice:

After 13 years of yoga practice and have tried many yoga props along the way.  You don’t need much to get started.  Here are a few of the yoga props I use at the studio and at home.

1.  Yoga Mat, by Yoga Nat

I love this yoga mat.   The quality is very good for the price.  I have this exact mat in my living room and after 2 years it still looks brand new.  It is soft with a relatively nice thickness compared to other yoga mats I have tried.  In addition, it has nice grooves that keep the mat in place.

Yoga for nurses: yoga mat
Yoga for nurses: yoga mat

Manduka yoga blocks (with strap included)

Yoga straps are useful for all levels of yoga practice and can provide support, help with alignment and improve posture.  In addition I love the Manduka cork yoga blocks because I have had mine for 6 years and they still look brand new!  Unlike foam blocks, these don’t disintegrate over time due to sweat and regular use.  They are also heavier and more sturdy with a trustworthy grip.  It is a good idea to purchase 2 because many yoga poses require the need for two blocks.

Yoga for nurses: yoga blocks and strap

Yoga for nurses: yoga blocks and strap

Additional Recommended Reading:

What are you doing to take better care of yourself, nurse?  Feel free to leave a comment below!

6 Best Nurse Pocket Organizers For Nursing Shifts

6 Best Nurse Pocket Organizers For Nursing Shifts

(This article about nurse pocket organizers contains affiliate links.  You can find my disclosure page here.)

How do you keep your nursing accessories organized during a nursing shift?

If you are like many busy nurses, you may be stuffing your pockets – which isn’t very organized at all. Not to mention, it looks very unprofessional for a nurse to be shuffling through their pockets for one of many nurse tools and accessories they need throughout the shift.  (I’ve been that nurse too, believe me!)

The reality is that nursing shifts are already insanely busy as they are…  do you really want to keep making a dozen extra trips around the unit for things you keep forgetting?

How many times have you had to walk back to the nurses station, supply room or med room for things such as:

I can’t tell you how many times I had to leave a patients room to go back and find something that I had forgotten.  Especially in my early nursing career days.

Until one day it finally dawned on me that many of these supplies could be kept organized right within an arms reach at all times.  I can’t even tell you how much time that saved me!

I was never a fan of the “fanny pack” look (although, believe it or not, fanny packs are coming back into style here in Los Angeles!).  But my goal has always been to provide excellent care to may patients, so if a “fanny pack” helps me achieve that, then I was all for it!

Besides, as a new nurse grad, I needed all the help and support I could get.  And now almost 8 years into my nursing career I still use a nurse pocket organizer just like #3 on this list!

Have you ever thought about using a nurse pocket organizer or fanny pack?

These are simple solutions to preventing unnecessary trips back to the supply room for random things you forgot to grab.

Being a great nurse involves managing your time well.  Nurses already have enough on their plates when taking care of patients during their shift.  Less unnecessary trips for supplies = more time for patient care.

Nurse pocket organizers also help keep nursing shifts less stressful.  Knowing you have the supplies you need within your reach at all times will not only keep you more calm in stressful situations, but you will appear more professional as well.

The best nurse pocket organizers for nurses:

1.  New Gear Medical – Nurse Pocket Organizer

Medical Gear Hip Bag Antimicrobial, Nurse, Homecare, Medical Organizer Belt, Grey

This product is one of the larger nurse pocket organizers on the market.  The nurses who have used this say they love it because they can keep everything they think they may need with them.

For those who want the extra space to carry more nurse accessories on them and and even a small notebook, this one may be right for you.

Order Now!

More about this product:

  • Hands free carrying system- keep key items at your fingertips
  • Dimensions: 14″ L x 7.5″ H, Weight: 1 lbs. – Fits up to a 44 inch waist
  • Antimicrobial technology
  • Water resistant

 

2.  Valencia Med 2 Sided – 9 Pocket Nurse Organizer Utility Belt

Valencia Med 2 Sided - 9 Pocket Organizer Utility Belt, Black

This is product is also highly rated by customers for durability.  It is a more compact nurse pocket organizer – however it still has 9 pockets including one zippered pocket (great for keeping cash & credit cards). You can see from the photo that it is still large enough to hold a cell phone.

Order Now!
More about this product:
  • Specifically designed for nurses
  • 9 Pockets (one zippered-two netted)
  • Belt length: can extend to 42 inches
  • Organizer size: 6 x 8 inches.
  • Double Sided/Reversible- so you can wear on either side
  • (Items in photo do not come with this product).

 

3.  Prestige Medical Pink Belt Loop Organizer Kit

Prestige Medical 736-PNK Belt Loop Organizer Kit with Forceps
Prestige Medical 736-PNK Belt Loop Organizer Kit with Forceps

Keep in mind that this product does not come with a belt but it fits easily in most scrub top pockets or in the cargo pocket of most scrub pants.  May work better for nurses who prefer not to have the traditional “fanny pack” appearance.  It does have a belt loop on the back that fits most belts.

This cute pink nurse pocket organizer is very compact- but just might be the right amount of space you need for your supplies.

This particular product also makes a great gift for a nursing student or new nurse graduate because it also comes with the products shown in the photo.

Also included in this nurse organizer:

  • 4 Pocket Pal with Belt Loop
  • Includes Scissors
  • Forceps
  • 3 Color Pen and Penlight
Order Now!

More about this product:

  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 4.5 x 0.5 inches

 

4.  KangaPak Nursing Organizer Belt – 9 Pocket Utility Pouch

KangaPak Nursing Organizer Belt - 9 Pocket Utility Pouch for Stethoscopes, Scissors and Other Medical Supplies, (Black)
For the nurse that wants a lot of storage – this is a nurse organizer you may want to consider.  Many of the reviews mention that it is able to fit a cell phone as well as keys – along with other important nurse supplies needed during the workday.
Keep in mind that although it is made of durable material, the more you put in, the heavier it will get.   In addition it does not have skinny “pen style” pockets – if that is important to you.   (Supplies in photo not included)
Order Now!
More about this product:
  • Sits on the waist
  • Has 9 mesh pockets so you can easily see everything inside
  • Elastic belt adjusts to most waistlines and moves with your body throughout the day -made of breathable, machine-washable canvas
  • Fits close to the body 
  • Dimensions: 9 × 8.5 × 2 inches, belt measures 24 inches at its shortest, 37 inches fully extended, weight 6.5 oz

 

5.  Pocket Pal II Medical Instrument Organizer/Pocket Protector

ADC 216 Pocket Pal II Medical Instrument Organizer/Pocket Protector, White with Royal Blue Accents

This product is a true pocket protector – it does not come with a belt but it fits easily in most scrub top pockets or in the cargo pocket of most scrub pants.

Also fits very well in labs coats –  is simple, and keeps your pockets clean and organized!  You wont lose your pens with this nifty organizer.   It fits basic items that you need in your packets and makes them easy to find versus digging around in your pockets.

Order Now!

More about this product:

  • Snap open belt loop reinforced with hook and loop adhesive
  • Velcro restraining strap secures scissors

6.  Cherokee Women’s Nurse Apron Organizer Belt

Cherokee CMGNA Women's Nurseatility Organizer Belt Navy/Turquoise Trim One Size

This product had a lot of great reviews- and it comes in several other colors as well.   This apron-style nurse organizer easily helps to organize pens, highlighters, flushes, scissors and alcohol pads right at your fingertips.  The belt is adjustable and fits unobtrusively on the hip.

Order Now!

More about this product:

  • Neoprene
  • Soft washable neoprene
  • Apron organizer belt
  • Has a 52 inch adjustable belt
  • Quick release buckle
  • Has 8 convenient pockets and 1 tape loop

Prices accurate as of:

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7 Helpful Ways To Stay Hydrated For Nurses

7 Helpful Ways To Stay Hydrated For Nurses

(This post is about helpful ways that nurses can stay hydrated and may include affiliate links.  You can find my disclosure page here).

Nurse holding a water bottle

Helpful tips for nurses to stay hydrated during 12 hour shifts

Hey nurses – how much water do do drink during a 12 hour shift?

If you are like most hard-working nurses, the answer is probably “not much.”

As nurses, we always encourage our patients to take the best possible care of themselves that they can.  However, many nurses either forget or don’t have time during very intensive shifts.  I asked several nurses recently what their water intake while they were at work and here is some of the feedback I got back:

“I try to remember to drink water but I always get so busy that I forget.   By the time I remember I am so thirsty!”

“I chug water whenever I can remember to drink.  Usually a few times a shift.”

“I almost always go home feeling so dehydrated because I do drink enough water during the day.  Its hard because every day is so hectic!”

7 helpful tips to stay hydrated for nurses

Many nurses don’t drink enough water during busy shifts. Nurse health matters too.

Water is important for nurse health.

It is no surprise that adequate amounts of fluid intake are vital to good health.  Additionally, drinking enough water prevents dehydration – which can result in unclear thinking (a bad situation for nurses giving patient care).

According to the Center For Disease Control And Prevention (CDC), dehydration causes:

  • Constipation
  • Headaches
  • Decreased physical performance
  • Dry mouth
  • Kidney stones
  • Mood changes
  • And it sucks your energy and just makes you feel crummy

On the flip side, staying hydrated results in:

  • Clearer skin
  • Better mental clarity
  • More energy
  • Better bowel movements
  • A happier mood

How much water should nurses drink during a 12 hour shift?

The Food And Nutrition Board set general recommendations for women at approximately 2.7 liters (91 ounces) of total water each day, and men an average of approximately 3.7 liters (125 ounces daily) of total water.

However, the reality is that a person’s size, activity level and medical needs among other factors will result in different fluid intake requirements for different people.

In addition, since many nurses are walking several miles and/or are on their feet for most of a single shift, I would consider nursing a very high activity level career.  Therefore, it is possible that many nurses may require a higher fluid intake on days they work.

How do you know if you are staying hydrated?

Checking your urine is a good way to gauge dehydration. If you’re well-hydrated, your urine will be mostly clear and just slightly yellow.  A darker yellow or amber color is a signal that you are not drinking enough fluids.

In addition, by the time you are feeling thirty, it is likely that you are already dehydrated.  Thirst is a great body mechanism that prevent us from going too long without drinking water!

Helpful tips to stay hydrated for nurses

Keep yourself accountable by keeping a water bottle with you at work

6 Tips For Nurses To Reach Daily Water Goals

Drinking enough water can be difficult for busy nurses with 1000 things already on their plate.  Especially since we are putting the needs of our patients lives first.  With these easy tips you can reach your water goals in no time.

#1.  Bring a seal-able lid water bottle to work with you every single day.  Having a container within arms reach maximizes the chances that you are going to actually drink water when you think about it.

#2.  Keep track of your fluid intake. This is easy when you use your own container as a gauge.  Decide how many refills you want to drink every shift and stick to it.  It makes staying hydrated a realistic goal.

#3.  Drink 2 glasses of water as soon as you wake up.  Drinking at least 16-24 oz of water first thing before a 12 hour shift will help set you up for success.  By making great progress early in the day, hitting your water goals seems much more attainable.

#4.  Eat your water.  Fruits and vegetables are not only great break room snacks but they are loaded with water that contributes towards your total water intake for the day.

#5.  Make your water more exciting. Infuse your water with chopped fruit, veggies and other herbs to make your water more exciting.  Consider the following ideas:

  • Stir in a tablespoon of chia seeds for more Omega three’s
  • Lemon or lime slices
  • Fruits such as apples, blueberries or strawberries
  • A veggie such as cucumber slices
  • You can infuse your water at home and bring it to work with you

#6.  Spice up your water. Consider drinking a few glasses of carbonated water in addition to your regular water.  Bubbly water often tastes more refreshing then flat water and may encourage you to drink a little more.  Have an expensive sparkling water habit like some nurses I work with?   Consider buying a Sodastream and make your own bubbly water at home!

Making sparkling water is a great way to meet your water intake goals. Click to learn more about Sodastream.

#7.  Do a “water challenge” with your co-workers.  Make your co-workers and yourself more accountable for drinking enough water during a shift by challenging each other to make it a priority! Set a goal for how many times you will fill up your water bottles throughout the day.  Then, make it official by putting stickers on your water bottles and adding a check mark each time you fill them up.  That way you are absolutely sure you are all drinking enough and staying hydrated!

A few great water bottle suggestions…

If you are working long nursing shifts then you need a water bottle to help you reach your water intake goals.  When you always have your water bottle with you, hitting your water intake goals are so much more attainable.

Hydroflask 40 oz Wide Mouth Water Bottle

Simple Modern Wide mouth 32oz Water Bottle

Nurture yourself, nurse.

Water is essential for staying hydrated, maintaining stamina and overall health and well-being.  Nurse health is as important as our patient’s health and must be prioritized to prevent dehydration during busy hospital shifts.

How will you make sure you drink enough water as a nurse?  If  you are a nurse looking to find ways to take better care of yourself as a busy nurse join our email list!

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5 Ways Nurses Can Practice Holistic Self-Care

5 Ways Nurses Can Practice Holistic Self-Care

(This post is about self care for nurses and may contain affiliate links.  See our disclosure page for more information.)

Written by Deborah Swanson at allheart.com.

5 Ways Nurses Can Practice Holistic Self Care

Self care for nurses should not be an afterthought.

Holistic nurse self care:  Are you really taking care of yourself?

While we often associate the concept of “self-care” with things like getting a massage or engaging in some retail therapy (new stethoscope, anyone?), taking care of yourself requires a much more comprehensive approach than just these occasional indulgences. A holistic approach to self-care acknowledges not only your physical health, but also your mental, spiritual and social health as well. Engaging in holistic self-care will help you become the best nurse that you can be and help you stay healthy for both yourself and your patients.

The World Health Organization defines self-care as “the ability of individuals, families and communities to promote, maintain health, prevent disease and to cope with illness with or without the support of a healthcare provider.” A holistic approach to self-care encompasses several different components—including nutrition, lifestyle, environmental and socioeconomic factors—to make sure that you’re not neglecting any aspect of your wellness. Below, we break down each of these elements and explain how nurses can practice them in their daily lives.

5 Ways Nurses Can Practice Holistic Self Cares

Holistic self care for nurses

Nurse Nutrition

When it comes to self care for nurses, we often don’t practice what they preach.  Nurses know that what we eat and drink are major contributing factors to health. While there are many diets and nutrition philosophies out there, the basics of eating healthy are quite simple. Focus on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and lean proteins; don’t eat too many sugary and/or fatty foods; stay away from highly processed, packaged items as much as you can; and watch your portion sizes. Also seek out a variety of foods to make sure you’re getting all your nutrients.

As for what you drink, make sure to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water and avoiding sugary beverages such as soda and juice. When it comes to beverages such as caffeine and alcohol, consume them in moderation and give your body time to process each drink before downing another. Watch the calorie count on your liquids. Beverages can be surprisingly high in calories, sometimes even more than food of a comparable portion size, so check the label before slurping it down.

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Nurse Lifestyle

As for positive lifestyle choices you can make, exercising regularly and getting a mix of cardiovascular and strength-building workouts are really important for a healthy life. Getting enough sleep and maintaining a regular sleep schedule as much as possible are also good choices. Your lifestyle can also include your social and spiritual activity, such as spending time with supportive friends or engaging in a meaningful religious community—both of which can boost your mental health.

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Woman Running

Running is a great fast and easy workout for busy nurses to fit into their schedules.

Environment

Environmental factors that affect your health are often overlooked, but incredibly important. Certain obvious examples come to mind such as exposure to air pollution, lead paint or other toxic substances. But this is far from the only way the environment impacts your health. Access to grocery stores (which sell produce and healthy foods) and public transportation (which encourages walking and mobility) are just two other instances where the environment can impact your health.

You won’t always be able to change your environment, but being aware of how it affects your health is the first step in self-care. And when you can take steps to improve your environment—such as reducing your exposure to toxic chemicals in your workplace—prioritize them and make them happen.

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Nurse Financials

Socioeconomic status encompasses not just how much money you make, but also what level of education and financial security you have as well as your perceptions of your own social class. Low socioeconomic status negatively affects both physical and mental health in a variety of ways. For example, those with low socioeconomic status are not able to afford preventative care or cover the costs of a medical emergency. Financial insecurity also causes stress, which can lead to a variety of other health problems.

Even though it might not seem like traditional “self-care,” make sure you’re taking steps to get or stay financially healthy. Thankfully, the median annual salary for registered nurses in the US is $70,000, so hopefully you’re being fairly compensated—but smart management of your money is just as important as how much you make. Create a monthly budget, set aside money in savings from each paycheck and spend less than you make. Once you’ve got an emergency fund (3-6 months of living expenses), look into a 401k or other long-term savings plan.

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While “self-care” is often used in a very narrow sense of the word, the concept is actually quite broad and requires a holistic approach to be truly successful. If you only pay attention to one or two aspects of your health but ignore the others, you’ll be doing yourself a disservice as a nurse and as a human being. You deserve to be in the best health possible, so make sure your approach to self-care covers all five components mentioned here.

About The Author

Debbie Swanson, Real Caregivers Program at allheart.com

Deborah Swanson is a Coordinator for the Real Caregivers Program at allheart.com – a site dedicated to celebrating medical professionals and their journeys.  She keeps busy by interviewing caregivers and writing about them and loves gardening.

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